Growing Older in World Cities: Implications for Healthy Aging

By Rodwin, Victor G.; Gusmano, Michael K. | Aging Today, November/December 2006 | Go to article overview

Growing Older in World Cities: Implications for Healthy Aging


Rodwin, Victor G., Gusmano, Michael K., Aging Today


Growing Older in World Cities, edited by Victor G. Rodwin and Michael K. Gusmano (Nashville, Tenn.: Vanderbilt University Press, 2006) is the first book to emerge from the World Cities Project, which the editors codirect. It is the first research project to examine in depth how major metropolitan areas are confronting the challenges of global aging. The project is a collaborative effort of the International Longevity Center-USA; New York University's Wagner School of Public Service, where Rodwin serves as a professor; and Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, where Gusmano is an assistant professor. The following article, printed here with permission of the publisher, is adapted from Growing Older in World Cities.

Declining birthrates, increasing longevity and growing urbanization have created a new challenge for cities: how to respond to an aging population. The World Cities Project was designed to examine whether the four largest cities among the wealthiest nations of the world-New York, London, Paris and Tokyo-offer a model of what other cities will someday resemble as their populations grow older.

Perhaps the four world cities examined here will always be regarded as special cases; however, they share in common a host of important characteristics. Within them live the largest number of older people in their countries, and in some neighborhoods the percent of elders 65 or older far exceeds what the census demographers project for their nations in 2030. Thus, these great cities may serve as laboratories to inquire about the implications of demographic change for health and quality of life, living arrangements and housing, and the provision of long-term care to older adults when they eventually become frail.

POWERFUL INFLUENCE

New York, London, Paris and Tokyo exercise a powerful influence in the world beyond their national borders. But are these influential centers prepared to meet the challenge posed by what Robert N. Butler has called the revolution of longevity? How will these world cities accommodate this revolutionary demographic change? Are they prepared to implement the innovations in health and social policies that may be required to serve their residents, both old and young? Will they be able to identify the new opportunities that increased longevity may offer? Can they learn from one another as they seek to develop creative solutions to the myriad issues that arise? And, can other cities learn from the experience of these four giants as they confront this challenge?

Most existing studies of health and long-term care systems fail to distinguish rural from urban and dense inner urban from suburban settings. This oversight is problematic not only because most elders live in cities, but also because the institutions serving them in inner urban and suburban areas differ from those serving older people in rural areas. Also, the magnitude of and diversity within world cities suggest that they hold multiple communities of older adults with widely disparate incomes and needs!

The likely causes and consequences of human longevity and population aging have been the subjects of sustained study worldwide, as well as the topics for important expert meetings of the United Nations (Vienna, 1982; Malta, 1986; and Madrid, 2002). But almost no attention has been paid to the impact of these trends on health and quality of life in cities, where most of the world's population will reside in the future.

HIGH CONCENTRATION

Among cities in the United States, New York has the highest concentration of people over age 65-close to a million. London, Paris and Tokyo have the highest concentration of elders in their countries. These cities already include neighborhoods in which the percentage of those ages 65 or older is greater than 20%, the level the U.S. Census Bureau projects for the entire country in 2030. As a result, these cities can serve as social laboratories in which to test alternative interventions that address the health and social needs of urban aging populations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Growing Older in World Cities: Implications for Healthy Aging
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.