California Report Offers Urban Strategies for Aging Well

Aging Today, November/December 2006 | Go to article overview

California Report Offers Urban Strategies for Aging Well


The "sweeping demographic transformation" that will elevate the population of those 65 or older will place unusual pressures on California cities, according to "Aging Well: New Ideas for an Older California," a new publication developed by the Center for Civic Partnerships of the Public Health Institute, a nonprofit based in Sacramento, Calif.

California, which has the largest 65-plus population in the United States, will see its older residents more than double, from 3.5 million in 2000 (10.6% of the state's population) to 8.2 million in 2030 (17.8%). According to Civic Partnerships' executive director Joan M. Twiss, "Cities and other units of local government, as well as nonprofits and the business sector, need to start planning and allocating resources now to avert more costly remedial measures in the future."

"Aging Well" includes the following checklist of strategies for communities, adapted here with permission.

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

* Appoint a resident commission to conduct research and develop a multiyear action plan.

* List volunteer opportunities in city and community publications, on websites and in other public venues.

* Develop public and private resources to promote, recruit, retain and celebrate volunteer work by older adults.

* Optimize participation in public meetings through assistive technologies, such as hearing or translation devices.

* Sponsor meetings at sites where older adults congregate.

* Encourage elders' involvement in policy development and advocacy.

TRANSPORTATION

* Promote safe, alternative transportation methods beyond the personal automobile, such as bicycling, walking, and neighborhood electric vehicles.

* Ensure that local transportation services meet older-adult needs by, for example, linking van and shuttle services with mass transit or providing transportation vouchers.

* Offer incentives to developers that incorporate smart-growth principles into community design.

* Develop infrastructure improvements (wide sidewalks, benches, good lighting, and increased time limits at crosswalk signals, for example) that support safe use by pedestrians and those with mobility impairments.

VARIED HOUSING OPTIONS

* Review state planning documents on housing to identify gaps between current supply and projected older-adult needs based on income, cultural identity and other population-based factors.

* Work with lending institutions, the building industry and others to preserve affordable senior housing.

* Work with lenders, builders and others to build mixed-use, affordable senior housing.

* Support development of barrier-free housing by endorsing concepts of universal design and visitability. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

California Report Offers Urban Strategies for Aging Well
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.