Globalization

American Annals of the Deaf, Fall 2006 | Go to article overview

Globalization


I was working on an editorial for this edition of the Annals when I received copies of the articles for the summer, 2006 edition for a final read-through before they were sent out for typesetting. I put the editorial aside and began to read the articles one last time for content and proofreading. As is typical for this journal, the articles addressed a range of topics: fingerspelling and sign language, mental health services, assessment of academic functioning, teacher interaction with a deafblind child, technology and the teaching of mathematics, health and incidence of overweight among deaf children, sign language assessment, and reading comprehension. There was something unique bout the summer edition, however: the international nature of the work. The first authors for the eight articles were based in six different countries; two were from the United States, two from the Netherlands, and one each from England, Israel, Taiwan, and Spain, with the last one representing a Spanish-Chilean research team reporting on research on Chilean Sign Language. At this point, I put aside the editorial I was working on-either for the winter issue or for good, and reflected on the implications of this development.

First, I received a charge more than ten years ago from the Joint Annals Administrative Committee to encourage manuscript submissions from outside of the United States and Canada. This has been successful and the percentage of manuscripts from other countries has increased steadily. Most issues of the Annals have least one or two articles from other countries. This has been facilitated by the fact that almost all manuscripts are now submitted-and reviewed-electronically. Also, English is a commonly used academic language and authors usually are familiar with it.

I went back and looked at the articles appearing in the Annals over the past few years. Although each country is unique, the topics addressed in the articles appear to be independent of the country of origin. Work on reading comprehension, sign language assessment, mental health, math instruction, school placement, children with multiple disabilities, and perceived stress could have come from any number of countries and have general application. Research techniques-from data gathering to analysis to reporting-are similar. In essence, communication barriers are coming down rapidly and we already are becoming more and more a global village. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Globalization
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.