The Collaboration of Music Therapy and Speech-Language Pathology in the Treatment of Neurogenic Communication Disorders: Part I-Diagnosis, Therapist Roles, and Rationale for Music

By Hobson, Marly Rychener | Music Therapy Perspectives, July 1, 2006 | Go to article overview

The Collaboration of Music Therapy and Speech-Language Pathology in the Treatment of Neurogenic Communication Disorders: Part I-Diagnosis, Therapist Roles, and Rationale for Music


Hobson, Marly Rychener, Music Therapy Perspectives


ABSTRACT:

This two-part article addresses collaboration of music therapists (MTs) and speech-language pathologists (SLPs), specifically in the treatment of neurogenic communication disorders (NCDs). Part I of this article will include the following: (a) definitions and descriptions of several NCDs relevant to music therapy practice; (b) a brief overview of SLP treatment approaches and techniques for these disorders; and (c) a rationale for applying music therapy methods with these disorders and discussion of several techniques commonly used.

When language is impaired due to neurological damage, it is referred to as a neurogenic communication disorder (NCD) (Brookshire, 2003). The term neurogenic is comprised of the prefix neuro-, meaning "related to nerves" or "the nervous system," and the suffix -genic, meaning "resulting from" or "caused by"; therefore, neurogenic communication disorders are disorders resulting from nervous system pathology (Brookshire, 2003, p. 1). Because communication is a primary treatment area, a patient with a NCD is likely to be referred to a speech-language pathologist (SLP) for assessment and/or subsequent habilitation or rehabilitation. Some of the treatment goals may be effectively addressed in music therapy as well; however, the role of the music therapist (MT), at present time, may be less clearly defined within the treatment team. Therefore, this two-part article will address defining NCDs, their treatment, rationale for the use of music with NCDs, and the role of SLPs and MTs respectively in collaborative treatment.

Music therapists likely have general familiarity with the role of SLPs: assessment, treatment, and referral services for individuals with communication and other related disorders, such as speech, language, voice, and swallowing disorders (ASHA, 20016; Brookshire, 2003). Beyond that, some MTs may lack a comprehensive understanding of what SLPs actually do. Conversely, SLPs may be unfamiliar with possible applications of music therapy for persons with communication disorders or may harbor concerns regarding whether MTs are professionally prepared to address the treatment objectives of this clientele. This lack of understanding can contribute to communication breakdown that can reduce provision of treatment options for clients who can benefit from a collaborative treatment approach. An understanding of NCDs and their characteristics can provide an important foundation for effective collaboration.

Neurogenic Communication Disorders

Neurogenic communication disorders can be further categorized in terms or neurogenic language disorders, including various forms of aphasia or neurogenic motor speech disorders, such as apraxia of speech and various forms of dysarthria (Brookshire, 2003; Hegde, 1998).

Neurogenic Language Disorders

Aphasia is a neurogenic language disorder resulting from acquired brain damage, such as cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs, i.e., strokes), brain trauma (e.g., brain injury from automobile accidents), brain tumors, or progressive neurological diseases (Brookshire, 2003; Hegde, 1998). Multiple definitions of aphasia can be found in the literature due to the various considerations of types of aphasia and varying definitions of language (Hegde, 1998); however, for the purposes of this article, aphasia can be defined as "a language impairment that crosses all input and output modalities" (Brookshire, 2003, p. 569) or a deficiency in the ability to understand and/or create language (Brookshire, 2003; J. Gordon, personal communication, September 16, 2002; Hegde, 1998). Aphasia can affect different aspects of language, such as speaking, comprehension, reading, writing, and gesturing, for example. There are several kinds of aphasia and differential diagnosis is often controversial (Hegde, 1998). In broad terms, aphasia can be categorized in terms of fluency or prosodie (melodic) aspects of speech. Individuals with a form of fluent aphasia speak naturally and with ease, incorporating more normal speech rate and emphasis, whereas individuals with a form of nonfluent aphasia speak slowly and laboriously with frequent pauses (Brookshire, 2003). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Collaboration of Music Therapy and Speech-Language Pathology in the Treatment of Neurogenic Communication Disorders: Part I-Diagnosis, Therapist Roles, and Rationale for Music
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.