Importance of the Club of Treated Alcoholics

By Zoricic, Zoran; Ivancic, Iva et al. | Alcoholism, January 1, 2006 | Go to article overview

Importance of the Club of Treated Alcoholics


Zoricic, Zoran, Ivancic, Iva, Matosic, Ana, Alcoholism


Summary-A club of treated alcoholics is a multifamily association organized on the principle of self help and mutual help of its members being engaged in continuous modification of the way of life, growth and maturation of treated alcoholics. Since 1964, when the first club of treated alcoholics (CTA) was founded in Zagreb, organized by Department of Psychiatry, Alcoholism and Other Dependences, Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital, Zagreb, the number of clubs has progressively increased, reaching its maximum before the Croatian War of Independence which, due to the objective reasons, disabled the activity of many clubs in the war involved areas. After the war, the activity of clubs gradually restored and today, the CTA represent the fundamental and unommitable mode of tertiary prevention of alcohol dependence, being integrated in the general program of prevention and treatment of alcohol induced disorders.

Key words: Alcohol dependence; Groups of self and mutual help; Rehabilitation of the alcohol dependents

A club of treated alcoholics (CTA) is a multifamily association organized on the principle of self and mutual help of its members acting continuously with the aim of changing the way of life, and achieving growth and maturation of the alcoholics treated. From the legal point of view CTA in Croatia is an unprofitable association comprising of:

- treated alcoholics after finishing their hospital treatment,

- persons having problem with alcohol that were not hospitalized up to now,

- members of their immediate families,

- friends and experts.

In the club, the family procedure is practised together with the instructions about alcoholism. The family members take part in the years long process of modification of behaviour and the establishment of a new, more successful and more suitable way of life, without alcohol. Alcohologic school of Zagreb, established by the Department of Psychiatry, Alcoholism and other Dependences, with Vladimir Hudolin at its head, had the leading role in fighting and solving alcohol-linked problems and alcoholism not only in Croatia, but also in other countries.

The first club of treated alcoholics has been founded in 1964. in Zagreb and since then, to the middle 80-ies their number progressively increased up to more than 600. The important contribution to the development of clubs in this period was the shift from the hospital to the outhospital programs of treatment.1,2

In the early days of clubs of treated alcoholics, the expectations consisted of abstinence up to one year. Further development and experience showed that the abstinence might last for years, sometimes even for a lifetime. It strives to change the behavior and lifestyle in community, what becomes the main purpose of work and rehabilitation through clubs, while the pure abstinence is now just a condition without which it is not possible to achieve that aim.

The end of 80-ies brought the first signs of socioeconomic and social turmoil and in the beginning of 90-ies, the war began in the area of former Yugoslavia. Therefore many clubs stopped working and the activity of others fell much bellow the earlier level, especially in the areas close to the war operations. Nearly 80% of clubs stopped working and the rest survived only due to the enthusiasm of few experts, as well as of the treated alcoholics. The professional and financial support of social environement failed because of its engagement in more important, was related problems like war victims and refugees. Besides, many club members were forced to exile or died in war.

During the Croatian War of Independence, in the occupied third of Croatia, the clubs stopped working, while in another third near the frontline, their activity was reduced to minimum (10% of their former activity) and in the west third, far from the frontline, the number of clubs was cut in half. Numerous war sufferers and exiles became the priority of social services which stopped to occupy themselves with alcoholism. …

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