Australia and the International Entertainment Industry*

By Newey, Kate | Nineteenth Century Theatre and Film, June 2006 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Australia and the International Entertainment Industry*


Newey, Kate, Nineteenth Century Theatre and Film


Theatres - the buildings and what is in them - are often regarded as metonyms for nations: the idea of the world held within the stage is a powerful one. This was never more so than on British stages of the nineteenth century, when the implicit assumption of the theatre was that it spoke also for the British Empire. Yet the late nineteenth century saw the development of national theatre cultures in settler colonies (Australia, New Zealand, Canada) which demonstrated a sometimes uneasy relationship between the centre and the margin, the coloniser and the colonised, the old world culture and the new. In Australia, while celebrating the special qualities of 'Australianness' in theatre with stories of the bush and bushmen (rarely women) and of the perils of the huge 'sunburnt country,' a staged version of Australia emerges which is at once strange but also oddly familiar to the English eye. Australian melodramas and pantomimes used local stories but balanced delicately (and sometimes ominously) between their audience's desires to see their own their stories on stage, and a sense that there was still a need to include the 'mother country' in these stories. In the 1890s, however, 'radical nationalism' attempted to counter the legacies of the colonising and dominating culture of the 'mother country,' to establish an aggressively Australian cultural ethos which was masculine, republican, rural, nationalist, and anti-imperialist - typified by J. F. Archibald's iconic magazine, the Bulletin. In doing so, cultural nationalists wiped out of Australian cultural memory the popular and the international elements of Australian culture, and most historians since have accepted this narrative of Australian cultural history.

This special issue of Nineteenth Century Theatre and Film brings to an international audience of theatre historians some of the important recuperative work being done in Australian theatre history.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Australia and the International Entertainment Industry*
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?