TCA Professional Growth Conferences: History and Future Direction

By Holt, Mary Lou; DeVaney, Susan B. | TCA Journal, Spring 2002 | Go to article overview

TCA Professional Growth Conferences: History and Future Direction


Holt, Mary Lou, DeVaney, Susan B., TCA Journal


The authors present an historical overview of what is now known as the Texas Counseling Association Professional Growth Conference, tender observations regarding its future development, and offer suggestions to increase the vigor of the institution.

In the year 1999 the Texas Counseling Association (TCA) thematically ushered in the new millennium at its professional growth conference entitled "Counselors Lighting the Way." During their two years of involvement in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of the conference, the authors grew curious about its origins, permutation over time, and future direction. Contacts with TCA Headquarters in Austin revealed that the organization did not keep records of conference evaluations and attendance data prior to 1995. The authors and TCA officials agreed that a thorough perusal of conference program booklets, which had been saved beginning in 1972, might contribute to an understanding of the organization's past, present, and future. The purpose of this article is to synthesize the material gleaned from our research, illuminate the nature of the organization, and make suggestions for a strong future.

History

The TCA Professional Growth Conference had its origins in 1947 as the "guidance section" of the 69th annual Texas State Teachers Association (TSTA). Dr. Virginia Love led this first meeting, which concerned the establishment of guidance programs in the public schools. The group prospered, eventually creating a constitution and by-laws and becoming a TSTA affiliate. In 1957, 210 participants registered for the first independent Texas Personnel and Guidance Association (TPGA) Conference. Although little information survives from the period, the following two decades saw tremendous growth in membership and conference attendance. By 1971 the group had grown to 1,851 members with 13 chapters and 3 divisions (TCA, 1976b).

The 1970s

Although TPGA did not use a standard format or schedule for conferences held during the 1970s, their organization and structure were similar to present day counterparts. The "conventions," as they were denoted, were organized under the direction of a single local coordinator in conjunction with TCA's central office. A loosely organized entity, TCA did not keep convention attendance figures; however, a clue to the general size of the conventions came in a single mention in the 1979 program booklet indicating that 1,445 participants had attended the previous year's gathering (TPGA, 1972-1983).

Usually scheduled for a long weekend in October, most conventions in the seventies followed a format of pre- and post-conference workshops, sectional programs, nationally known keynote speakers, a hall for collateral exhibits, and local tours. Thursday's schedule included tours and pre-convention workshops with Friday and Saturday devoted to business meetings and sectional programs. Convention planners featured special interest sections for elementary, middle, and secondary school counselors and scheduled popular programs for multiple slots. "Rap sessions" with keynote speakers, among them William Glasser, John Krumboltz, and Gilbert Wrenn, provided opportunities to meet important figures in the profession. In 1976, Forth Worth launched the tradition of using a general conference theme with "Let's Face It-We Need to Improve Our Images" (TPGA, 1972-1983).

The 1980s

Establishment of the Licensed Professional Counselor credential in 1981 brought about changes in the format of the convention. As the sole provider of continuing education units for licensure, TPGA adapted conference programming to meet the needs and expectations of newly licensed participants. Offering continuing education for the Texas Education Association (TEA) further cemented the organization's tie to the public schools. In 1983, TPGA adopted the designation Professional Growth Conference for its annual meeting; and in 1985, TPGA, now affiliated with the Association for Counseling and Development, changed its name to Texas Association for Counseling and Development (TACD). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

TCA Professional Growth Conferences: History and Future Direction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.