The Balance of Trade

By Keeler, Dan | Global Finance, February 2007 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

The Balance of Trade


Keeler, Dan, Global Finance


As the East Coast of the United States basked in unseasonably warm weather in early January, some shoots of hope sprouted from the frozen earth of the Doha round of trade talks (see our cover story, page 16). After only a gentle nudge from European negotiators, US president George W Bush threw his weight behind a renewed push from Europe to get the stalled talks moving again. At the same time, officials on both sides of the Atlantic expressed cautious optimism that the talks, put on ice last summer by World Trade Organization director-general Pascal Lamy, might yet recommence and produce some positive results.

Supporters of the process can only hope that the talks' glacial progress will yield some kind of agreement-and soon. While the WTO struggles to find a way to move forward, trading partners around the world are setting up smaller bilateral and regional agreements that could eventually render any global deal practically meaningless. China, for example, has just inked a deal with the Philippines that will boost trade between the two nations, and as we find out in our cover story, there are plenty of other pacts in the pipeline that will muddy the waters for the WTO negotiators.

Part of the impetus behind the scramble to establish trade agreements comes from the growth in the global economy and the surge in global trade.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

The Balance of Trade
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?