North Africa

By Wattad, Nizar | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, May 2002 | Go to article overview

North Africa


Wattad, Nizar, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


Egypt: Tourists No Longer Targets

In a bid to increase tourism revenues, Egyptian officials are working to improve the image of the country's central region, known most recently as the hotspot where insurgents carried out nearly a dozen attacks on tourists in the early to mid-1990s. According to the March 2 Saudi Gazette, government spokesman Hussein Abdel-- Hafez insists that now, "It is stable. Everything is quite calm." Still, the government insists that armored patrols accompany the few tourists who do venture into Middle Egypt, mostly to view the area's wealth of historic sites, including ancient Egypt's 14year capital of Tell Al-Amarna. There have been no militant attacks against tourists anywhere in Egypt since 1997, when Islamic radicals killed 58 foreign visitors at a pharaonic temple in Luxor.

Civilians Attacked in Sudan

According to a March I press release from CARE International, several humanitarian agencies have condemned the government of Sudan for its "intolerable" attacks on civilians in southern Sudan. The release noted several instances, including a Feb. 20 attack on a World Food Program distribution point in Bich, in the Upper Nile region, that killed 24 people and left dozens wounded. …

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