Maad Abu-Ghazalah Challenges Tom Lantos for Congressional Seat

By Pasquini, Elaine | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, May 2002 | Go to article overview

Maad Abu-Ghazalah Challenges Tom Lantos for Congressional Seat


Pasquini, Elaine, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


Elaine Pasquini is a free-lance journalist based in Ignacio, CA.

Maad Abu-Ghazalah is a young, intelligent, well-educated Arab American, and he's trying to do what no one has done before. He hopes to unseat Democratic Congressman Tom Lantos, who has represented California's 12th congressional district in Washington for the past 22 years.

The 39-year-old Nablus-born Abu-Ghazalah received a B.S. from the University of Notre Dame in 1983, a Masters in Computer Science from the University of Virginia in 1985, and a law degree from Santa Clara University in 1993. In 1996 he founded MAG Systems, which develops software for patent attorneys. Abu-Ghazalah is active in the Bay Area Arab-American community, having served as president of the local chapter of the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee (ADC) from 1998 to 2000. In November he will run as the Libertarian candidate for the California congressional district which includes Brisbane, Colma, Daly City, Foster City, Hillsborough, Millbrae, Montara, Moss Beach, Pacifica, Redwood City, San Bruno, San Mateo and the southwestern portion of San Francisco.

Abu-Ghazalah spoke to the Washington Report on Feb. 22 by his booth at the Islamic Society of San Francisco's Eid al-Adha celebration. "I decided to run following the 9/11 tragedy," he said. "Seeing Arab Americans being defensive about their heritage due to anti-Arab backlash, I thought, `it's okay to be Arab.' There is space for us."

Although a friend urged him to drop "Abu" from his name, he strongly disagreed. "We should be proud of our culture," he insisted, "and not change it or deny it for any reason."

One of Abu-Ghazalah's main concerns is protecting Americans' civil liberties, which he believes are being threatened by the current policies of the Bush administration--and, in particular, the actions of Attorney General John Ashcroft. Abu-Ghazalah's recently installed campaign billboard, a satire on a prime time television program, depicts a finger-pointing, accusatory-looking Ashcroft, next to the words "The Ethnic Profiler, Thursdays at 7 p.m. on the Spy Channel."

Another of Abu-Ghazalah's major concerns is the ever-expanding U.S. military action overseas. Unlike his Democratic opponent, Abu-Ghazalah opposes unconditional military aid to Israel. With respect to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, he told the Washington Report, "I am for the restoration of inalienable rights to the residents of the West Bank and Gaza, as well as to the refugees who have been prevented from returning to their homes."

Emphasizing his desire to represent all Americans, not just Arabs, he spoke proudly about receiving the endorsement of the Mexican American Political Association (MAPA).

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Maad Abu-Ghazalah Challenges Tom Lantos for Congressional Seat
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.