HOW E=MC^sup 2^ SHAPES THE DEBATE ON EDUCATIONAL REFORM

By Duffy, Francis M. | Journal of Staff Development, Spring 2007 | Go to article overview

HOW E=MC^sup 2^ SHAPES THE DEBATE ON EDUCATIONAL REFORM


Duffy, Francis M., Journal of Staff Development


HOW E=MC^sup 2^ SHAPES THE DEBATE ON EDUCATIONAL REFORM Productive Learning: Science, Art, and Einstein's Relativity in Educational Reform By Stanlslaw D. Glazek and Seymour B. Sarason 2007, Corwin Press Paperback, 269 pages, $35.95

To order, call 800-818-7243

Fax: 800-417-2466

Web: imww.conwinpress.com

Reviewer's rating: 2 out of 4

I remember reading Seymour Sarasons landmark book, The Culture of the School and the Problem of Change (Allyn & Bacon, 1971), as a graduate student at the University of Pittsburgh. That book was an important part of my education about the nature of change in school systems. Sarasons latest book, coauthored with Stanislaw Glazek, also teaches us about the nature of change in school systems, but it does so by leading us on a torturous journey through Albert Einstein's theory of relativity.

Confessions are best reserved for a confessional, but I must confess here that I had a difficult time getting through this book. I almost gave up. The first chapter read like a personal diary in which the authors recount in a rambling style their reasons for writing the book and explain their process. That process, which at first intrigued me, was for Glazek (a physicist) to teach Sarason (a psychologist) about the history and meaning of Einstein's E=MC^sup 2^ theory of relativity. The bulk of the book, 13 of 17 chapters, then focuses on explaining E=MC^sup 2^ as it was taught to Sarason. Although the authors wanted those chapters to communicate to readers Sarasons principles of productive learning, the chapters were very difficult to get through, especially when complex mathematical formulae were presented. I found those chapters personally unproductive.

But I persevered!

And the perseverance paid off in the last chapter, where Sarason clearly informs us of his concept of productive learning and reiterates his longstanding observation of the unceasing failure of educational reform (and the sharpness of his criticism is not blunted in this new book).

Sarasons concept of productive learning is not a new idea. And although he has been writing about it for years, his ideas are rarely implemented in school systems. He continues to argue for the need to transform school systems to create learning environments designed using the principles of productive learning. Productive learning, as he defines it, has several criteria, which he begins to describe on p.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

HOW E=MC^sup 2^ SHAPES THE DEBATE ON EDUCATIONAL REFORM
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.