Michael Power: The Struggle to Build the Catholic Church on the Canadian Frontier

By Comiskey, John P. | The Catholic Historical Review, January 2007 | Go to article overview

Michael Power: The Struggle to Build the Catholic Church on the Canadian Frontier


Comiskey, John P., The Catholic Historical Review


Canadian Michael Power: The Struggle to Build the Catholic Church on the Canadian Frontier. By Mark G. McGowan. [McGill-Queen's University Studies in the History of Religion, Series Two, Vol. 27.] (Montreal and Kingston: McGillQueen's University Press. 2005. Pp. xvii, 382. Can. $49.95.)

Mark McGowan grabs and holds the attention of his audience, from beginning to end, in this important biography of Michael Power, first bishop of Toronto, Ontario. Born in Halifax in 1804, Power went to Montreal and Quebec City for studies. He never returned to work in Halifax but, ordained at twentytwo, stayed in the Montreal region. His education and early ministry gave him experience and knowledge of French such that, at age thirty-seven, he was nominated bishop of the newly-created diocese in 1841. Ontario was pioneer territory when Power was consecrated. Despite the lack of personnel, resources, and the basic amenities of life, Power accomplished a great deal in a mere six years, as McGowan reports. It is no surprise that he was universally mourned at his untimely death in 1847, resulting from typhus contracted while caring for sick diocesans.

Presenting the story, McGowan serves the local and national Church but also a much larger audience, as this really is a "Life and Times" biography. McGowan gives the reader a picture of the man who was devout in faith, loyal to the Church and Magisterium, and rigorous in application of church law, while utterly pastoral, a tireless worker, truly humble and far-reaching in his thinking and planning for the nascent diocese.

Just as important, McGowan paints a larger picture giving context to Power's story. From his background in Nova Scotia, to the province of Quebec, to Ontario, McGowan provides a picture of the Church with its various accomplishments, tensions, and "growing pains." This was when Canada was moving toward nationhood, with the colony itself experiencing "growing pains" as a result of imperial rule and tensions leading to various rebellions .The universal Church figures prominently through Power's loyalty to the pope and with the influence that ultramontanism had in Quebec and on Power himself. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Michael Power: The Struggle to Build the Catholic Church on the Canadian Frontier
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.