Gender Differences in Oral Health Knowledge and Behavior of the Health Science College Students in Kuwait

By Al-Ansari, Jassem M.; Honkala, Sisko | Journal of Allied Health, Spring 2007 | Go to article overview

Gender Differences in Oral Health Knowledge and Behavior of the Health Science College Students in Kuwait


Al-Ansari, Jassem M., Honkala, Sisko, Journal of Allied Health


Dental caries and periodontal diseases have been declining in most industrialized countries, but this positive trend has not been seen in the Middle East. This study aimed to determine oral health knowledge and behavior of the students at the Health Sciences College in Kuwait as well as possible associated factors. This study was first conducted at the college of the male students (n = 153) during the autumn semester in 2001. A similar questionnaire study was then conducted at the college of the female students (n = 547) during the spring semester in 2002. The samples were merged for this study, for a total sample of 700 students. The response rate was 84% (n = 128) among the male students and 73% (n = 400) among the female students. Most of the students had visited a dentist during the past year, and quite a high proportion was seen for an examination or prevention. Female students reported twice-a-day toothbrushing frequency much more often than did male students. They also used fluotide toothpaste more often than male students. Oral health knowledge (as a summary variable) was statistically significantly higher among the female students than among the male students. It was also strongly associated with the older age among the female students. The knowledge and oral health behavior of the Health Sciences College students in Kuwait, especially among the male students, seems to be poor and calls for an urgent improvement of health education programs. J Allied Health 2007; 36:41-46.

THE MOST COMMON DENTAL DISEASES, dental caries and periodontal diseases, are almost totally preventable with good oral hygiene and restriction of the frequency of sugar intake.1 However, it is extremely difficult to change individual behavior in these respects.2 The incidence of dental caries has been declining in the industrialized countries.3-5 There has also been a positive development in the periodontal diseases globally, which has occurred with the improved oral health behavior of the population.6 However, this positive development has not taken place in the Middle East.7-10 Knowledge of oral health behavior does not necessarily lead to better health behavior,2,11,12 but better knowledge seems to be associated with better behavior.13,14 Because auxiliary health personnel specialize in preventive information and health promotion, it is important that their own health and oral health knowledge are good and their health behavior conforms to the professional recommendations. With proper knowledge and health behavior, they can play an important role in the health education of individuals and groups15-18 and act as role models for lay people and the community at large. They also have the professional responsibility to educate the population, particularly the male population.

The aim of this study was to determine the oral health knowledge and behavior of the students at the Health Sciences College in Kuwait as well as possible associated factors.

Methods

The Health Sciences College in Kuwait was established in 1974, with separate colleges for the female and male students. It offers the following programs: general nursing, pharmaceutical and medical sciences, oral and dental health (female students only), medical records, environmental health, food sciences and nutrition, and medical laboratory technology (female students only).

This study was first implemented at the college of the male students (n = 153) during the autumn semester in 2001. The descriptive results of the male students were ear lier reported by Al-Ansari et al.19 A similar study was then conducted among the students at the college for the female students (n = 547) during the spring semester in 2002. The samples were merged together for a total sample size of 700 students.

A questionnaire was distributed to all students of both colleges. Participation was voluntary, and the answers were anonymous. The response rate was 84% (n = 128) among the male students19 and 73% (n = 400) among the female students. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Gender Differences in Oral Health Knowledge and Behavior of the Health Science College Students in Kuwait
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.