Invisible Stars: A Social History of Women in American Broadcasting

By Brown, N. J. | Journalism History, Spring 2002 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Invisible Stars: A Social History of Women in American Broadcasting


Brown, N. J., Journalism History


Halper, Donna L. Invisible Stars: A Social History of Women in American Broadcasting. Armonk, N.Y.: M.E. Sharpe, 2001. 368 pp. $39.95.

Invisible Stars:A Social History of Women in American Broadcasting by Donna Halper is a discovery. It is history of broadcasting that was left in the past: the story of women in broadcasting. Traditional histories of broadcasting rarely mention women, but she has brought them back.

Halper does an exemplary job at chronicling women's roles as writers, performers, engineers, program directors, station managers, and network executives. Thus, she reveals the social history of women's changing roles throughout the decades since the start of radio, describing the trends and attitudes of each era and their impact on women and broadcasting. This book also records the growth of broadcasting and the transformations it went through with time. Each of these transformations impacted women's roles in broadcasting.

One of the critical eras for women that has been left out of traditional history books was the inception of radio. Halper notes that women were crucial participants in the early years. Before radio was a commercial venture and as it grew into a viable industry, women were important to the industry, especially as performers and program directors. Some women radio pioneers included Eunice Randall, Bertha Brainard, Eleanor Nesbitt Poehler, Vaughn De Leath, Ada Morgan O'Brien, and Marie Zimmerman.

Randall was the first woman of radio. In 1918, years before the first radio station was licensed, she was a radio engineer and announcer on station 1XE in Boston, which would later become WGI. Brainard hosted a popular radio show, "Broadcasting Broadway," on WJZ in which she reviewed Broadway theatre performance and interviewed actors. Later she was an executive at NBC.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Invisible Stars: A Social History of Women in American Broadcasting
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?