Sigmund Freud. Persönliche Erinnerungen [Sigmund Freud: Personal memories]/Recollecting Freud

By Pigman, G. W., III | International Journal of Psychoanalysis, April 2007 | Go to article overview

Sigmund Freud. Persönliche Erinnerungen [Sigmund Freud: Personal memories]/Recollecting Freud


Pigman, G. W., III, International Journal of Psychoanalysis


Sigmund Freud. Persönliche Erinnerungen [Sigmund Freud: Personal memories] by Isidor Sadger Tübingen: Diskord. (Huppke A, Schröter M, editors. Quellen und Abhandlungen zur Geschichte der Psychoanalyse [Sources of and treatises on the history of psychoanalysis], Vol. 4.) 2006. 160 p.

Recollecting Freud by Isidor Sadger (Dundes A, editor and translator, Jacobsen JM, translator) Madison, WI: U Wisconsin Press. 2005. 138 p.

Until the publication of this exemplary edition, edited by Huppke and Schröter, Sadger's Sigmund Freud: Personal memories had suffered a sad fate. At first, the book offended several people close to Freud, and they tried to prevent its publication. During his lifetime, it could not have been published because Sadger had intended it as a posthumous account, and, when Freud died, the political situation made its appearance impossible. A second blow was recently inflicted by an unbelievably bad English translation; the book fell victim to the amateurism which continues to plague the history of psychoanalysis. Since Sadger's memoirs were not published, the story of their attempted suppression is in some ways more interesting than the book itself. If it had appeared, as Sadger intended, shortly after Freud's death, it would have provided new information about Freud's early career, in particular the Wednesday Psychological Society and his lectures at the University of Vienna. But, in 2007, this book adds few details that have not surfaced already, although it remains an important document for the early years of psychoanalysis in Vienna. Today, Sadger's recollections may reveal more about this malcontent disciple than about the man whose personality he criticized and whose work he idolized.

At the beginning of his memoirs, Sadger presents himself as the oldest of Freud's pupils still practicing, and he may, in fact, have been the first psychoanalyst after Freud (May, 2003). From the winter semester of 1895-6, when he attended Freud's first lectures on the psychoneuroses at the University of Vienna, until 1933, when he resigned from the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society, Sadger maintained professional relations with Freud, although the two never appear to have been intimate. Probably around the time of the publication of a book on Freud by Sadger's nephew, Fritz Wittels (1924), Sadger himself began to write. By the end of 1927 or the beginning of 1928, he had completed the book; the two copies known to survive bear copyright dates of 1929 and 1930. But neither the German edition, printed and bound by Ernst Wengraf-Verlag, nor an English translation printed by Ferrar and Rinehart and now lost, was published.

It is not completely clear why the book never came out, although some of Freud's closest associates-his daughter Anna, Ernest Jones and Max Eitingon-did not want it published. This is apparent from the valuable appendix in which Huppke and Schröter reproduce some correspondence from 1932 and 1933, most of it discovered in the archives of the British Psychoanalytic Society (Thompson et al., 2005). Jones's role in the whole business was particularly unsavory. Leonard Woolf, of the Hogarth Press, who had been contacted by the American publisher, sent Jones copies of the book and translation and consulted him about publication in Britain. As Jones wrote to Anna Freud, 'The letter from the American publisher to Mr. Woolf was marked Confidential, but not his letter to me; so I felt justified in telling a few intimate friends' (p. 141). This may not be a surprising explanation from the man who coined rationalization, but, when Jones complained to Paul Federn that his own confidential communication had been betrayed to Sadger, one can hardly feel sorry for him.1 Sadger declined to submit his book to a 'disguised tribunal' (p. 143) and resigned from the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society on 10 November 1933 after 27 years of membership.

The memoirs are written as if Freud has already died, so, after the dispute with the Viennese, Sadger could not have published them without revision. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sigmund Freud. Persönliche Erinnerungen [Sigmund Freud: Personal memories]/Recollecting Freud
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.