Rosa Parks and Coretta Scott King: A Tribute to Legendary Civil Rights Leaders

By Russ, Pamela | Social Studies Review, Fall 2006 | Go to article overview

Rosa Parks and Coretta Scott King: A Tribute to Legendary Civil Rights Leaders


Russ, Pamela, Social Studies Review


Do not go where the path may lead Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail... Emerson

The legacy of Rosa Parks and Coretta Scott King is a testament to women throughout the world who have made sacrifices while making contributions to the betterment of individuals and people whose freedom, dignity and respect have been violated daily in their communities. Their enduring legacy for civil rights serves as a reminder that women have played a pivotal role in the fight for freedom and equal rights. We must continue their legacy by eradicating poverty, violence against women and other destructive social conditions. We must encourage our nation to direct its resources to the education of all children. The narrative poem below honors the lives and celebrates the contributions and accomplishments of Rosa Parks and Coretta Scott King, and the unwavering spirit of a people struggling for freedom and equality.

Rosa Parks and Coretta Scott King were noble women of purpose whose determination to improve a society forever changed the African-American community and America.

They were extraordinary citizens, tenacious women whose ideas withstood the test of time.

Our nation marveled at their courage and reflected on their commitment to the ideals of equality and justice, and their resistance to old points of view.

Faith and courage sustained these remarkable women through uncertainty, turbulent times, vicious attacks, Bloody Sunday bombings, the Ku Klux Klan, and imprisonment.

Civil disobedience became a movement - the Civil Rights Movement,

Of the people, by the people, and for the people.

Their difficult journey has inspired others throughout cities and states across the nation for fifty years.

The journey was a nonviolent struggle full of obstacles and setbacks.

However, our heroines walked on, leading the march, the struggle, the fight, advocating the idea that a free people must be allowed to vote, sit in the front of a bus, eat in a restaurant, and purchase a home.

On a mission, these two strong women called it a journey to freedom.

At it's peak, these heroines of the Civil Rights Movement experienced hardships, faced danger, and suffered losses.

They endured many trials and tribulations to improve the plight of African-Americans.

They created a path through inequality, unfair laws, and unjust policies to make a new road for the disenfranchised.

They demonstrated hope, resiliency and the strength to stand up for a people's rights to schooling, housing, transportation and employment.

They tirelessly and peacefully fought an important battle with dedication and determination while relinquishing their privacy and personal lives.

They devoted their lives to emancipating a people who were held in bondage by segregation, ignorance, injustice, and the belief that separate lives can be equal lives.

Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white passenger on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama in 1955.

Her act of defiance ignited a people's quest for freedom and sparked a powerful and enduring movement - the Civil Rights Movement, eventually leading to the end of legal segregation in the United States.

She became known as "The Mother of the Modern-Day Civil Rights Movement."

Throughout her life, Rosa Parks worked on many legal cases with the NAACP to improve the lives and liberty of African-Americans.

She collaborated with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and participated in many peaceful demonstrations against racial segregation to become one of the most important citizens of the 20th century.

Coretta Scott King learned the meaning of personal sacrifice when she became a widow in 1968 because her husband, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee.

She became one of the most influential and respected African-American leaders and advocates for civil rights of our time. …

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Rosa Parks and Coretta Scott King: A Tribute to Legendary Civil Rights Leaders
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