Tests of the Validity of Perceptions about Interactive Television Courses among Faculty Members and Students

By Benet, Suzeanne B.; Levenburg, Nancy M. | Journal of Private Enterprise, Fall 2000 | Go to article overview

Tests of the Validity of Perceptions about Interactive Television Courses among Faculty Members and Students


Benet, Suzeanne B., Levenburg, Nancy M., Journal of Private Enterprise


In the 1990's many institutions have begun offering programs and courses delivered via distance learning technologies, particularly for returning adult learners who are time- and location-bound, desiring to advance their education and career opportunities yet constrained by job and family responsibilities. One popular form of distance learning is interactive television, a technology that connects two or more classrooms with two-way audio and two-way video. Many faculty members, however, have expressed reluctance to become involved in distance education. Since they are instrumental in this educational process, a study was conducted in which the perceptions of four distinct groups were explored regrading various aspects of the distance learning experience via ITV; students who have and have not taken an ITV course, and faculty/administrators who have and have not taught an ITV course.

The results of this descriptive study, conducted during the Fall 1997 semester at a regional university, indicate that there are highly significant differences between what students think they will experience in an ITV course and the report from students who have taken such courses. In general, students anticipate a less effective class due to technological limitations. However, this was not the experience of students enrolled in ITV courses. Interestingly, in spite of the lack of problems related to technology, both faculty and students who have had experience with ITV-delivered courses still prefer face-to-face sections. As expressed by both groups, these preferences do not seem to be the result of technology-related issues. Instead, it appears that factors other than those related to the technology itself impact overall satisfaction levels and teaching/learning preferences. This is important to those who provide distance educational offerings since the success of distance learning programs and courses may well hinge on faculty members' and students' attitudes and perceptions. According to responses, teachers who have not used interactive television are most concerned about start-up issues and basic knowledge about the "nuts and bolts" of designing and managing distance education courses. Among faculty who had taught at least one interactive television course, the area of greatest concern was lack of personal contact, followed by the potential negative impact of technology on class discussions and course managementrelated issues.

A large number of faculty respondents also expressed concern about receiving appropriate training prior to teaching their distance education course. Consequently, one of the most important findings from this study is the potential impact that provision of appropriate training experiences may have on faculty attitudes towards teaching ITV courses.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Tests of the Validity of Perceptions about Interactive Television Courses among Faculty Members and Students
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.