Understanding Group Boundaries

By Roth, Jeffrey D. | Addiction Professional, March/April 2007 | Go to article overview

Understanding Group Boundaries


Roth, Jeffrey D., Addiction Professional


Boundaries, boundaries, boundaries-we cannot live without them, but can we live with the ones we create? We create boundaries, whether we are aware of them or not, whenever we begin a new group or meet with an already existing one. The most elementary boundaries relate to time, space, task, and role. How we understand these boundaries may inform us about more complicated ones, such as how we deal with contact among members, or between members and us, outside of the group.

I will outline my understanding of in-group boundaries in this column, and devote the next column to the thorny issues that arise over contact outside of the group.

Organizing influences

Time boundaries include how often the group meets, on what day(s) of the week, at what time, how long it meets each session, and for how many sessions it is scheduled to meet (time-limited versus ongoing). While we may take time boundaries for granted, they have a powerful organizing influence on the life of the group.

I was trained in an ideology of precise time boundaries, so I started and ended my groups on time. When I was leading my first groups on an inpatient substance abuse unit, I continued this pattern. I was unprepared for the fallout from this simple procedure. The patients began to complain to their other therapists when their other groups (which had never operated on any consistent schedule) were not similarly consistent. After a couple of decades of conducting outpatient group therapy, I have become a little more flexible about time boundaries, but still I am rarely more than five minutes late starting or ending a group.

Space boundaries involve both the group's institutional setting (residential treatment, agency, or private practice) and actual physical setting. The institutional setting has a prominent effect on the primacy of the group's attachment to the therapist. In residential treatment, the group member has an initial attachment to the treatment institution that employs the therapist, who is generally unknown before the group members arrive in the first group. In contrast, in a private practice setting the patient usually comes to the therapist by individual reputation or referral.

Similarly, the actual physical setting is determined by the institutional setting. In residential treatment or an agency, the group therapist might have little or no authority to determine the size of the group room, the comfort of the chairs, the presence of a door that can be locked, or the quality of the room's soundproofing. The therapist in private practice has more influence over all of these aspects of the physical setting, and each of these aspects has its own impact on the experience of the group's boundaries.

To cite one egregious example regarding a group setting, one therapist whom I supervise told me of a medical director who routinely would barge into group sessions-as if the group did not have or deserve boundaries.

Focused to the proper task

The primary task of a therapy group is to provide help to its members. While therapists might have many different theoretical orientations that lead to different ways of formulating exactly how this help is delivered, the direction of authority is unambiguous. …

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