Nail the Resume - Great Tips for Creating Dynamite Resumes

By McIntosh, Sally | Career Planning and Adult Development Journal, Fall 2005 | Go to article overview

Nail the Resume - Great Tips for Creating Dynamite Resumes


McIntosh, Sally, Career Planning and Adult Development Journal


Nail the Resume - Great Tips for Creating Dynamite Resumes by Ron and Caryl Krannich. 2005. Manassas Park, VA: Impact Publications. 222 pages, Soft Cover., $17.95.

Intended Audience: A, D

Major Headings from Table of Contents:

Dynamite Resumes Generate Interviews and Offers; Resume Do's and Don'ts; 68 Writing, Production, Distribution, and Follow-Up Principles; Evaluate and Improve your Resume Competence; Transform an Ordinary Resume Into a Dynamite Resume; Dynamite Resume Sampler; Resume Worksheets.

How is the book most useful for its intended audience?

It is most useful for its intended audience because it explains why or why not to do something in a very clear and concise manner. It does not waste the reader's time on irrelevant information.

The top five things you learned from reading this book:

1. Candidates should be prepared to enter online profile forms in lieu of a resume.

2. It is not necessary to include all education degrees or diplomas on your resume.

3. If you use only years (rather than months and years) for the length of time in your jobs, you can cover most short-term time gaps.

4. Limit the resume to one to two pages.

5. For each job or skill, put the most important information first.

The doctors Krannich have written a book to help job seekers develop effective resumes. They give time-tested tip after tip. The book is concise and full of good information. There were two important themes in the book:

1. The first was that resumes are not going away. They are here to stay. "It remains the single most important document you will write and distribute throughout your job search. It's an important product. It may represent the potential solution to employers' problems. A resume is an advertisement for an interview...to get employers to take action."

2. second, they continually stress that the resume has to focus on the employers' needs and the fact that the candidate can add value to the company. One has to do more than just write one's employment history. Further, the Doctors tell us that resumes are "sound indicators of your probable future performance." Will the candidate add value to the company's bottom line? They say that "you must present your past in such a manner that it clearly indicates patterns of performance that are good predictors of your future value for your next employer." The result needs to be accomplishment-based. Take a look at the sample resumes to see what the authors mean by accomplishment-based. The authors provide the reader with information on the types of resumes and when each type is the most effective; 12 resume myths and realties; writing errors and mistakes (including how the resume can eliminate one from consideration); how to develop a plan of action for your resume and job search; what the normal resume categories are; and, methods of getting your resume seen by the right people.

They explain why key words are so important. It is because of optical scanners and resume data bases. More and more employers are using resume scanning software to search the resumes for particular words or phrases. These keywords are usually desired skills or particular industry jargon. …

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