ICTM Slovenia Symposium

By Kovacic, Mojca; Sivic, Ursa | Bulletin of the International Council for Traditional Music, April 2007 | Go to article overview

ICTM Slovenia Symposium


Kovacic, Mojca, Sivic, Ursa, Bulletin of the International Council for Traditional Music


'Ethnomusicology and Ethnochoreology in Education: Issues in Applied Scholarship' Ljubljana, September 21-25, 2006

The newly approved ICTM National Committee for Slovene has organized a complex scholarly gathering in the country's capital Ljubljana that encompassed five groups of activities:

(1) International scholarly symposium Etnomuzikologija in etnokoreologija v vzgoji in izobrazevanju: Bistvena vprasanja aplikativne znanosti / Ethnomusicology and Ethnochoreology in Education: Issues in Applied Scholarship;

(2) Meeting of the ICTM's Executive Board;

(3) Gathering of Slovene ethnomusicologists and Board members;

(4) Gathering of Slovene ethnomusicologists and Board members with Austrian organizers of the 39th World Conference; and

(5) Workshops provided respectively by the Board and the Slovene hosts. The event was organized through joint efforts of all institutions and associations involved in ethnomusicological activities in Slovenia: ICTM's Slovene National Committee, University of Ljubljana, Institute of Ethnomusicology SRC SASA, Slovene Musicological Society, Cultural Society Folk Slovenia, and Slovene Ethnographic Museum, which also hosted the symposium.

Ethnomusicologists and ethnochoreologists based in fourteen countries from various parts of the world (Australia, Austria, Canada, Croatia, France, Germany, Ireland, Malaysia, The Netherlands, Norway, Serbia, Slovenia, UK, and USA), themselves representatives of different generations and research traditions, presented their experiences and visions of efficient transfers of scholarly knowledge into educational domains. Presentations from contexts around the globe discussed modalities of connections between theory and practice, methods of promoting, teaching and learning of traditional music and dance, and the strategies of preparing textbooks, recordings and other materials for various stages of educational processes.

The first day of the symposium featured presentations in English by Board members, Austrian organizers of the forthcoming world conference in Vienna, and scholars invited because of the symposium's theme. In the opening session Svanibor Pettan traced current developments in applied ethnomusicology, John Morgan O'Connell pointed to the impact of ethnomusicological thought to the field of music education, and Kjell Skyllstad discussed methodological implications of the contact between ethnomusicology and music education. The second session was dedicated to the use of ethnomusicology in bridging the barriers in relation to indigenous people in Canada (Beverley Diamond), youths in Malaysia (Tan Sooi Beng), minorities in Austria (Ursula Hemetek) and in the context of fieldwork in Brazil (Regine Allgayer Kaufmann). Participants in the third session focussed on classroom methodologies in teaching west Javanese cianjuran music (Wim van Zanten), traditional musics in Taiwan (Marianne Broecker), folk music in Austria (Gerlinde Haid) and didjeridu in Australia (Stephen Wild). The fourth session featured ethnomusicologists who applied their knowledge and skills in leading workshops on overtone singing and spoon playing (Tran Quang Hai), as well as in producing compact discs for teaching Aboriginal music (Allan Marrett) and a world music textbook (Jonathan Stock).

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