And the Winners Are

By Turner, George | American Cinematographer, October 1988 | Go to article overview

And the Winners Are


Turner, George, American Cinematographer


The Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, on August 27, presented its 1988 Emmy Awards for cinematography to Woody Omens, ASC, and Roy H. Wagner, ASC. Wagner's statuette in the category of Outstanding Cinematography for a Series honored his work in the pilot film of Beauty and the Beast produced by Republic Pictures. The one-hour production aired on CBS-TV on September 25, 1987. Omens won his Emmy in the category of Outstanding Cinematography for a Miniseries or a Special for the Universal Television production, I Saw What You Did, which was telecast May 20, 1988.

Omens' award marks his sixth Emmy nomination and his third successive win. His previous awards were given in 1986 for the Movie of the Week, An Early Frost and last year for the pilot film, Heart of the City. A thriller about two teenage girls who play the old gag of dialing phone numbers at random and who accidentally flush out a real murderer, I Saw What You Did is rich in both slice-of-life reality and eerie suspense along the Alfred Hitchcock lines. As director of photography, Omens interpreted the changing moods of the story through judicious use of light and shadow and subtle application of color, implying a growing menace in a normal, workaday milieu.

Much of Omens' artistry undoubtedly derives from his knowledge of the fine art of painting. He received his BAE degree from the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Chicago before entering the USC Cinema School, where he earned his MA. He still pursues painting as an avocation, specializing in airbrush and egg tempera work. He has been a motion picture photographer for 23 years.

Somebody Waiting, a documentary film co-produced by Omens, was nominated for an Oscar in 1971. His theatrical and TV productions include History of the World Parti, Magnum, P.I. (pilot and 2-hour special), Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Madame X, Fire on the Mountain, The Red Light Sting, Man in the Santa Claus Suit, Evergreen, and many others - including more than 1500 commercials.

Wagner was an actor and singer before he entered the photographic field as a portrait photographer's assistant soon gravitating into the making of W and theater commercials. …

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