Book and Media Notes

The Arkansas Historical Quarterly, Spring 2007 | Go to article overview

Book and Media Notes


In Horns Up!!: College Bands of the Arkansas Heartland, T. T. Tyler Thompson documents the birth, growth, and development of marching and concert bands at nine institutions of higher learning in Arkansas-Henderson State, University of Central Arkansas, University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, Arkansas State, Southern Arkansas University, Arkansas Tech, University of Arkansas at Monticello, Ouachita Baptist, and Harding. Tyler devotes a chapter to each school, providing a brief history of its musical groups and the people who built and maintained them. Photographs, though, are the book's real strength. Each chapter includes scores of historic photographs and other images illustrating musical developments. Although the bands at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, are not covered in Horns Up!!, Tyler devoted an earlier book, The University of Arkansas Razorback Band: A History, 1874-2004 (2004), to them. Published by Phoenix International, Horns UpU costs $30.00 (cloth) and is distributed by the University of Arkansas Press, 201 Ozark, Fayetteville, AR 72701; (479) 575-3246; www.uapress.com.

The Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History at the University of Arkansas Libraries in Fayetteville has released a series of twentyeight interviews documenting President Bill Clinton's early years in Hope and hot Springs.

The Pryor Center, along with the Miller Center for Public Affairs at the University of Virginia, has been commissioned by the Clinton Presidential Library and Museum to conduct in-depth interviews to document the entirety of Clinton's life. The Pryor Center is responsible for documenting five phases of Clinton's life: the Hope-hot Springs years; the GeorgetownOxford-Yale years; the post-college years when Clinton was teaching at the University of Arkansas School of Law and serving as Arkansas attorney general, 1973-1978; the gubernatorial years, 1979-1981, 1983-1992; and the post-presidential years. The Miller Center is responsible for conducting interviews focusing on the White House years, as they have done for every outgoing administration since that of President Carter.

The Pryor Center has interviewed forty individuals in the Hope-hot Springs phase, with seventeen from the Hope years and twenty-three from hot Springs. A number of the interviews from this first stage are still undergoing review by the persons interviewed, and they will be released soon. All of the Clinton Project interviews are posted at http://libinfo.uark.edu/SpecialCollections/pryorcenter/default.asp.

In 2002 and 2003, as the city of Fort Smith was expanding its reservoir in Crawford County, a team from the Arkansas Archeological Survey removed coffins from two historic cemeteries facing inundation.

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