Message from the Editor

By Gibson, Jane Whitney | Journal of Applied Management and Entrepreneurship, April 2007 | Go to article overview

Message from the Editor


Gibson, Jane Whitney, Journal of Applied Management and Entrepreneurship


It is my pleasure to welcome you to the April 2007 issue of JAME.

The articles in this issue look at a variety of interesting topics including intellectual capital, knowledge workers, e-harassment, auditor risk assessment and new product commercialization. We begin with an article by Biaise Sonnier, Kerry Carson and Paula Phillips Carson entitled, "Accounting for Intellectual Capital: The Relationship between Profitability and Disclosure." The focus here is on the interesting relationship between disclosure of intellectual capital and the relative high or low financial performance of the firm. The article suggests that young firms may increase the level of their intellectual capital disclosure to account for the relatively low financial performance while more mature, better performing organizations may decrease such disclosure in order to protect their intellectual assets.

The second article, "A Twenty-First Century Incongruity: Perceptions Regarding Knowledge Worker Didactics" was written by John Russette, Robert Preziosi, Robert Scully and Francisco de Cossio. It's my pleasure to point out that Prof. Preziosi was the Founding Editor of JAME and we welcome him back to our list of current authors. The article adds to the foundation upon which educators can create meaningful and relevant teaching strategies and methods appropriate for today's knowledge workers.

The next article, "E-Harassment: Employee Perceptions of E-Technology as a Source of Harassment" has appeared in its entirety in the July, 2006 issue of JAME. We are reprinting it here because the journal inadvertently left the name of the third author off the original article. Written by Patricia Borstorff, Glenn Graham, and Michael Marker the article looks at a new and growing type of workplace harassment. Concerns are raised as to whether existing harassment policies go far enough to include Internet and email usage.

The article by Hsueh-ju Chen, Shaio Yan Huang, and F. Barry Barnes "A Cross Cultural Study of Auditor Risk Assessment in Emerging Capital Markets" continues in the JAME tradition of studying management concepts in international settings, in this case suggesting that audit practice is not culture-free. Specifically the article examines the differences in cultural values between auditors in Singapore and Taiwan in terms of Hofstede's cultural dimensions of uncertainty avoidance, power distance, and individualism as they relate to audit risk.

The fifth article, "New Product Commercialization: Needs and Strategies," written by Gerald Udell and Mike Hignite focuses on a case study of commercialization needs of 1700 new products which participated in a nationwide new product screening process done in cooperation with Wal-Mart. The article makes a strong case for the need for an unbiased audit process for product development policies, procedures, and processes.

Thanks to our Executive Interview Editor, Roland Kidwell, for providing another wonderful executive interview for the April issue. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Message from the Editor
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.