The Bookshelf

By George, George L | American Cinematographer, May 1980 | Go to article overview

The Bookshelf


George, George L, American Cinematographer


FACETS OF CINEMA

Carlos Clarens' CRIME MOVIES is an incisive analysis of the social and political trends that have affected the genre since early in the century. Discussing its evolution under the pressures of prohibition, war, depression, the rise of labor unions, the FBI's red scare and the inroads of Nazism, Clarens provides a uniquely insightful illustrated perspective on a significant part of film history (Norton $16.95/8.95).

In THE MAKING OF STAR TREKTHE MOTION PICTURE, Susan Sackett and the film's producer Gene Roddenberry chronicle the long unhappy record of the project and its eventual fruition. Extensive documentation is provided about production, special and optical effects, as well as the human element involved (Pocket Books $14.95/7.95).

An overall surveyjpf 3cl-fi films, John Brosnan's FUTURE TENSE offers an informative and thoughtful appraisal of the genre. Abundantly illustrated, it covers history, content and techniques, and highlights the evolution in literary material on which sci-fi movies are based (St. Martin's $7.95).

Extensive research into the background of movie stars is evident in Barry Newman'sTHE HOLLYWOOD GREATS. Gable, Flynn, Tracy, Cooper, Bogart, Crawford, Colman, Harlow, Garland and Laughton appear in this assessment of the impact of their life style on a movieconscious society (Franklin Watts $12.95).

Sandford Dody's GIVING UP THE GHOST describes with wit and style his association with Bette Davis, Helen Hayes, Robert Merrill, Eiaine Barrymore and Dagmar Godowsky (whose autobiographies he ghosted) and Judy Garland, Katharine Hepburn and Eisa Lanchester (with whom negotiations failed). A highly personal and self-revealing book (Evans $10.95).

Playwright Arthur Miller's CHINESE ENCOUNTERS, a sensitive report on his recent trip, includes interesting glimpses on China's film industry recovery from the excesses of the Cultural Revolution, and mentions past difficulties and current hopes of film directors and performers (Farrar Straus Giroux $25).

In MOVIE POSTERS, Steve Schapiro and David Chierichetti assemble an attractive album of 119 representative samples of film publicity placards by U.S., French, German, Japanese and other artists (Dutton $19.95/10.95).

REFERENCE AND RESEARCH

A thoroughgoing guide to careers in motion pictures, GETTING INTO FILM by MeI London, now in an updated edition, provides advice from an experienced f ilmmaker on a wide variety of jobs from director to script clerk. Features, documentaries, industrial and government films, television shows and commercials are expertly covered in this eminently practical text (Ballantine $9.95).

The way to prepare a marketable film presentation for prospective investors is demonstrated in HOW TO SELL YOUR FILM PROJECT, an effective, detailed;. guide by Henry Beckman, replete with sample forms, budget charts and other essential material (Pinnacle Books $9.95).

Movie industry consultant Michael Cook has assembled a comprehensive manual, EXECUTIVE HANDBOOK OF BUSINESS AND VIDEOTAPE that offers valuable counsel to corporate officers on commissioning a film/TV production about their company (Michael Cook Inc., 200 W. 79 St., NYC 10024; $5).

In WRITING THE SCRIPT, veteran scenarist Wells Root spells out the basic elements of scriptwriting-story, character, conflict, dialogue, suspensethrough pertinent examples from outstanding films. …

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