Letters

By Jensen, Michael A. | Aging Today, May/June 2007 | Go to article overview

Letters


Jensen, Michael A., Aging Today


For Privatizing Social security

To Aging Today:

I am writing in response to the lengthy article by Barbara B. Kennelly ("ASA Award Winner sees Resurgence of Privatization Effort," March-April 2007). I am in complete disagreement with her points and philosophy.

It is an understatement to say that she is in denial concerning the long-term viability of Social security. The program cannot under any circumstances continue for the long term as it is now structured, even with extending the retirement age and increasing the percentage of income paid in Social security taxes. It is mathematically unsound for the long term.

Further, to attack privatization without acknowledging that such a plan in the long term relieves the federal government of a substantial and unsustainable liability simply demonstrates a political agenda without substance. Moreover, privatization provides greater benefits to its contributors than does the present system, without even considering the substantial gains from prudent investments over time as many 4oi(k) plans have demonstrated.

I am appalled that Kennelly doesn't even mention how unfair the current system is to a surviving spouse in cases when the surviving spouse doesn't receive any benefit from the decades of contributions paid into the Social security system by the deceased spouse. …

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