Trends in Health and Aging: An Online Tool for Professionals

By Lentzner, Harold | Aging Today, May/June 2007 | Go to article overview

Trends in Health and Aging: An Online Tool for Professionals


Lentzner, Harold, Aging Today


EASY ACCESS TO STATS-AND MORE

In the midst of writing a grant proposal or report, professionals in aging often find themselves asking, "Where can I find those statistics? I know I saw them last week-or was it last summer? I'll never meet this deadline." Those who rely on data to develop and run programs, make policy, do research or teach know they're blessed with an abundance of health information in the United Statesbut frequently, they don't know how to find it quickly or organize it efficiently.

Trends in Health and Aging (THA), a Web-based tool developed and maintained by the National Center for Health Statistics, attempts to connect consumers of information on health and aging with suppliers of such data by providing userfriendly access to up-to-date information on the health and well-being of older Americans.

Because so much information is available, the project focuses on trends in such important measures as life expectancy and death rates; the prevalence of leading chronic conditions; the use of inpatient, outpatient, nursing home and home healthcare; and functional status and behavioral risk factors. In each case, THA offers national or state-level data collected via federal systems.

THA is a collection of tables showing statistical trends in health and aging with indicators displayed over time and by age, sex and race. To obtain the material, users can visit the THA website and, free of charge, select a table or tables of information to extract needed data or customize a table to suit their needs. Professionals can, for example, summarize the data in a bar graph, line graph or pie chart and download it to their computer or presentation software.

Other features of THA give users ready access to important documentation about the data they are using and offer tools to create new summary statistics, map statebased data or employ statistical testing. A Spanish-language version is also available.

HOW THA WORKS

How does THA work? Suppose a health administrator at an agency serving elders wishes to obtain information for a report showing the effects of diabetes on older adults, their families and the healthcare system. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Trends in Health and Aging: An Online Tool for Professionals
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.