The Bookshelf

By George, George L | American Cinematographer, August 1975 | Go to article overview
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The Bookshelf


George, George L, American Cinematographer


HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF

Contemporary aspects of the film industry have deep roots in the past, whose effect on personalities, methods and philosophies are traced in several significant current books.

Kenneth Anger's HOLLYWOOD BABYLON, largely rewritten from its original French edition of some 25 years ago, is a sizzling exposé, both factual and inferential, whose lyrical enthusiasm, nostalgic kitsch, and febrile doomsday warnings have the fascination of a sado-masochistic nightmare. (Straight Arrow $14.95)

Long-time MGM story editor Samuel Marx has written, in MAYER AND THALBERG: THE MAKE-BELIEVE SAINTS, a topnotch "inside Hollywood saga about the competitive relationship of the two giants who made MGM the great studio it once was. (Random House $10.)

Lindsay Patterson's BLACK FILMS AND FILM-MAKERS is a documented and informative anthology about the development of a popular new film genre. (Dodd, Mead $12.50)

In THE BIRTH OF THE TALKIES: FROM EDISON TO JOLSON, Prof. Harry M. Geduld presents an authoritative and data-filled survey of film history through the emergence of sound. (Indiana U. Press $12.50)

Useful and perceptive, E. Bradford Burns' LATIN AMERICAN CINEMA: FILM AND REALITY offers revealing insights into aspects of Latin American social structure as seen through its films. (UCLA $3.95)

Expertly compiled by John Stewart, FILMARAMA (Vol. I, 1893-1919) is a comprehensive cross-indexed listing of all performers appearing in the films of that period, an indispensable research tool for scholars. (Scarecrow $15.)

Significant references to film are made in Jay W. Baird's important study, THE MYTHICAL WORLD OF NAZI WAR PROPAGANDA, 1935-1945, indicating the use of movies to shape and manipulate public opinion. (U. of Minnesota Press $15.)

In MARVELOUS MELIES, Paul Hammond spins an entertaining tale, delightfully illustrated, about Georges Méliès, the magician turned filmmaker, who pioneered trick photography and launched movies on a new, magical path. (St. Martins $10.)

Covering films, books and politics, attorney Charles Rembar, in PERSPECTIVE, narrates with vigor and persuasiveness the battles he fought on behalf of the freedom of the screen and our basic civil liberties. (Arbor House $8.95)

SCRIPTERS AND SCRIPTS

There are several methods of publishing screenplays. Editor Richard J. Anobile's consists in reconstructing a picture through 1000 or more frame blow-ups shown sequentially with accompanying full original dialogue. His two latest volumes in the series are JOHN FORD'S STAGECOACH and ERNST LUBITSCH'S NINOTCHKA. (Avon/Flare $5.95 ea.)

Editor Anobile also presents in similar fashion "GODFREY DANIELS!", a hilarious assemblage of verbal arrd visual gems from the short films of W. C. Fields. (Crown $8.95)

The complete script of François Truffaut's Oscar winner, DAY FOR NIGHT, ably translated by Sam Flores, is as enchanting between covers as it was on the screen. (Grove $3.95)

A Blue Ribbon winner at the recent American Film Festival and originally made for television, Alvin H. Goldstein's THE UNQUIET DEATH OF JULIUS AND ETHEL ROSENBERG is a meticulously documented and movingly written screenplay about a traumatic episode in our recent history.

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