Supervisees' Contributions to Stellar Supervision Outcomes

By Norem, Ken; Magnuson, Sandy et al. | Journal of Professional Counseling, Practice, Theory, & Research, Spring 2006 | Go to article overview

Supervisees' Contributions to Stellar Supervision Outcomes


Norem, Ken, Magnuson, Sandy, Wilcoxon, S. Allen, Arbel, Osnat, Journal of Professional Counseling, Practice, Theory, & Research


This qualitative inquiry was conducted to acquire insight regarding the limited number of supervisees whose growth exceeds that of other good supervisees. Twelve experienced supervisors described supervisees who had achieved outstanding growth during supervision. Findings revealed that stellar supervisees possessed an integrate composition and combination of maturity, autonomy, perspicacity, motivation, self awareness, and openness to experience.

Supervisees' Contributions to Stellar Supervision Outcomes

Examination of clinical supervision's contributions to counselors' professional development is fraught with confounding variables and complications (Bernard & Goodyear, 2004). Complexities associated with empirical examination of clinical supervision include the multiple and diverse direct and indirect participants: supervisors, supervisees, and clients. In this regard, Lesser (1983) suggested that the "supervisory room is crowded with all sorts of 'persons' who create anxieties for both the supervisor and the supervisee. It is often more crowded than the analytic one" (p. 126). Additionally, individual, interactional, and developmental factors between supervisors and supervisees are uniquely and diversely experienced and expressed. Nonetheless, the relationship is paramount to supervision (Bernard & Goodyear, 2004; Cohen, 2004; Haynes, Corey, & Moulton, 2003; Magnuson, Wilcoxon, & Norem, 2000).

Bernard and Goodyear (2004) amplified the complexity of supervisory relationships, and suggested "each supervisee brings to supervision a rich blend of experience, insight, and habit that will affect supervision with or without the supervisor's knowledge" (p. 135). Authors and researchers have identified a variety of supervisee attributes, activities, and experiences that interfere with successful supervision experiences such as anxiety (e.g., Bernard & Goodyear, 2004; Costa, 1994), transference (e.g., Bernard & Goodyear, 2004; Lane, 1986), and resistance (e.g., Bernard & Goodyear, 2004; Kadushin, 1968).

Authors have also focused on qualities associated with "good supervisees" (Vespia, Heckman-Stone, & Delworth, 2002, p. 58). Rodenhauser, Rudisill, & Painter (1989) sought descriptors associated with successful supervisees in psychiatry preparation programs. Findings derived from participants' short lists of characteristics were categorized as "(a) basic personal qualities/the foundation, (b) facilitators of relationships with supervisors, (c) facilitators of relationships with patients, (d) facilitators of content/theory learning, and (e) facilitators of process/skills learning" (p. 369). Prominent attributes within these broad categories included openness, reliability, initiative, enthusiasm, interpersonal curiosity, flexibility, empathy, minimal defensiveness, introspection, and receptivity to feedback. These authors suggested that personal qualities, attitudes, and values are more predictive of clinical performance than intellectual ability.

Vespia, Heckman-Stone and Delworth (2002) developed a scale, isolating behaviors and characteristics associated with counseling psychology supervisees who "use supervision well" (p. 58). The scale includes items such as "accepts feedback in a nondefensive manner," "demonstrates willingness to grow," "listens attentively to supervisor," "critiques own work," and "tolerates ambiguity by struggling for own answers " (p. 60). These authors suggested that supervisors use the scale to provide orientation to supervision, thereby introducing conversations regarding mutual roles and responsibilities as well as clarifying expectations in the context of supervision. The authors further proposed the scale as a tool for remediation when supervisors and supervisees encounter difficulties.

Norem and Magnuson (1997) endeavored to isolate qualities associated with success in a masters level counselor education program, and provide empirical support for student selection criteria.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Supervisees' Contributions to Stellar Supervision Outcomes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.