Decision Support Systems and Artificial Intelligence Technologies in Aid of Information Systems Based Marketing

By Crunk, John; North, Max M. | International Management Review, January 1, 2007 | Go to article overview

Decision Support Systems and Artificial Intelligence Technologies in Aid of Information Systems Based Marketing


Crunk, John, North, Max M., International Management Review


[Abstract]

The primary goal of this study is to predict the next logical and practical approach in the use of advanced Decision Support Systems (DSS) and Artificial Intelligence to find and evaluate markets for prospective products. In addition to determining these markets, DSS will then be used to predict the success of the market and other product lines that can be brought to those markets, making companies more successful in the structuring of marketing models and product lines.

[keywords] Decision support system; artificial intelligence; marketing; DSS; marketing model; 1ST; IS; global marketing

Introduction

Information Systems Technology (1ST) is becoming a more prominent part of global marketing. With the aid of 1ST, companies can become competitive in all phases of customer relations (Ives and Learmonth, 1984). The use of information technology for finding markets is expanding, enabling companies to keep up with prospective markets in today's dynamic economy. 1ST accomplishes this feat by helping marketing departments determine targets for their products and charting the most effective way to cover the largest market in the shortest amount of time. They also enable marketing to establish trends so that new products coming to market can be quickly evaluated and decisions made on the best placement for these products.

Information Systems (IS) today are designed with reusability in mind. They span multiple markets, enabling companies that design products to sell them to several different companies interested in gaining an edge with respect to the marketing of their products (Bakos, 1991). IS includes Advanced Decision Support Systems (DSS) that are able to assist businesses in making decisions about a market without the need for investing costly resources testing that market with product. The DSS can test and even predict the way in which a particular market will respond to certain products without the need to release those products into the market. IS scientists use databases with prediction models, and in some cases Artificial Intelligence (AI), to model the healthiest market for a particular product or to create models for a particular market of interest (MaLec, 2002).

Evaluation of Current Systems

The following is a concise evaluation of Decision Support Systems and their history. Some discussion of these systems and how they are used today for the furthering of marketing decisions is also presented. When a clear understanding of the current technology has been presented, it will be possible to continue to the next section, which will delineate the future of DSS and AI.

History of Decision Support Systems (DSS)

The history of DSS arguably began in 1965; some of the earliest beginnings of DSS are represented in Table 1 (Power, 2003).

Other milestones that helped along the way include the creation of tools like Lotus 123(TM) and Microsoft(TM) Excel(TM), both of which enabled people to crunch numbers and view them in a presentation manner not available before the 1980s. Tremendous hardware advancements and the reduction in computer size also contributed to DSS development. IS moved from being luxury that only very large organizations (such as the Department of Defense or I. B. M.) could afford to be an operation with a budget footprint that most businesses could handle.

Current Technology

One of the most prevalent technologies today is the relational database system. With the appropriate data, relational database systems are able to predict the best potential markets for prospective products. Unfortunately, the appropriate data is not always available, and new product lines are not able to take advantage of such systems. Therefore, relational systems often lack the ability to predict the best markets. More promising and relatively successful technologies are Expert Systems, Fuzzy Logic, and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN).

Expert Systems.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Decision Support Systems and Artificial Intelligence Technologies in Aid of Information Systems Based Marketing
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.