The Bookshelf

By George, George L | American Cinematographer, June 1975 | Go to article overview

The Bookshelf


George, George L, American Cinematographer


CINEMA PASTAND FUTURE

A panoramic study by Jerzy Toeplitz, Polish film historian now head of the Australian National Film School, HOLLYWOOD AND AFTER offers a comprehensive survey of the "changing face of American cinema." It analyzes with insight and originality the U.S. movie industry, its creative and corporate leaders, and the profound changes that time has brought. (Regnery$12.95/9.95)

Axel Madsen's THE NEW HOLLYWOOD views the current scene in the film capital as an aggressively streamlined operation geared to today's exploding culture, as it rises from the chaotic demise of antiquated production methods, no longer relevant attitudes and passé personalities. (Crowell$7.95)

Boldly blaming our disastrous Asian policy on movie-created public attitudes toward war, Julian Smith's LOOKING AWAY: HOLLYWOOD AND VIETNAM is a challenging and fascinating book. It documents the U.S. film industry's inability to deal with that conflict except figuratively (e.g. M.A.S.H.) or psychopathically (e.g., The Green Berets), and provides controversial fare for political scientists, film students and plain movie buffs. (Scribner's$8.95)

A highly readable account by Oxford Prof. D. J. Wenden, THE BIRTH OF THE MOVIES is a fresh approach to the history of film as seen in its societal and economic context. (Dutton $5.95)

FILMS AND THEIR MAKERS

Top directors speak out in THE MEN WHO MADE THE MOVIES, Richard Schickel's spin-off from his brilliantly conducted interviews as seen last season on public TV. Under Schickel's expert prodding, Capra, Cukor, Hawks, Hitchcock, Minnelli, Vidor, Walsh and Wellman respond with enlightening comment, wistful reminiscences and piquant anecdotes. (Atheneum $12.95)

For FILMMAKING: THE COLLABORATIVE ART, Donald Chase (with an assist from the American Film Institute) has interviewed scores of creative individuals involved in the making of movies, from producers to special effects men, and singling out the cameramen's contribution. This informative report draws a clear and lively picture of a complex medium. (Little, Brown $9.95)

Viewing cinema as the "fabulous fantasy machine," David Annan's MOVIE FANTASTIC evokes in some 300 bewitching stills the most memorable moments in the camera work of hallucinatory, weird or esoteric motion pictures. (Crown $2.95)

Humorist's S. J. Perelman's involvement as a scriptwriter with Mike Todd's epic, Around The World In 80 Days, is recounted in one of the pieces assembled in VINEGAR PUSS. Perelman's traumatic experience is told with mordant wit and lethal personalitydeflating jabs. (Simon & Schuster $7.95)

Edited by F. Maurice Speed, FILM REVIEW 1974-75 is an attractive textand-photo roundup of world production, and covering such related topics as the communication media, awards and festivals, film books·and a forecast of films to come. (Transatlantic Arts $12.50)

Sharon Smith's WOMEN WHO MAKE MOVIES contributes solid and timely information to our knowledge of cinema. Her broad study combines an historic survey of women as film directors, cinematographers, editors, writers and producers; a report on "new filmmakers;" and a directory of 725 U. …

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