On: Die Vergessene Kinst: Der Orpheusmythos Und Die Psychoanalyse der Musik [Forgotten Art: The Orpheus Myth and the Psychoanalysis of Music]

By Stein, Alexander | International Journal of Psychoanalysis, August 2007 | Go to article overview

On: Die Vergessene Kinst: Der Orpheusmythos Und Die Psychoanalyse der Musik [Forgotten Art: The Orpheus Myth and the Psychoanalysis of Music]


Stein, Alexander, International Journal of Psychoanalysis


Dear Sirs,

The opening sentence of Dantlgraber's review (2007) contains the claim that Leikert's book may be the first monograph concerning the relationship between psychoanalysis and music. It is important for the IJP's readership to appreciate that, in fact, the interdisciplinary study of music and psychoanalysis is a long-established and presently flourishing field.

Nearly two decades ago, Stuart Feder (Feder et al., 1990) published the first volume of Psychoanalytic explorations in music, a compendium of the seminal writings to that point on music from a psychoanalytic perspective. A second volume (Feder et al., 1993) followed, anthologizing more current thinking. And, of course, these were by no means pioneering ventures; beginning nearly contemporaneously with the advent of psychoanalysis itself (for more detailed accountings of the history and evolution of psychoanalytic contributions to the study of music, see Nass, 1989; Noy, 1966, 1967; Stein, 1999, 2006, 2007b), there have been numerous and, in recent years, increasingly sophisticated writings by authors expert in both fields explicating the important affinities between music and the mind (see, for example, Nagel, 1998; Nass, 1971; Rose, 2004; Stein, 2004a, 2004b, 2007a).

The Mind and Music Project, of which I am co-director, publishes an online bibliography (http://www.mindandmusic.org/bibliog.html) of all known works explicitly or tangentially addressing music from a general psychoanalytic orientation. At present (and continually updated), more than 800 references are listed.

While music may be considered a universal language, discourse about it comes in a multitude of tongues. It may be that Dantlgraber's review, more than merely introducing Leikert's book to a wider audience, can serve as call and catalyst for expanded dialogue among scholars working in disparate locales and languages. I hope that Leikert's book will eventually be available to Englishspeaking analysts.

[Reference]

References

Dantlgraber J (2007). …

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On: Die Vergessene Kinst: Der Orpheusmythos Und Die Psychoanalyse der Musik [Forgotten Art: The Orpheus Myth and the Psychoanalysis of Music]
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