Treaty Update

Arms Control Today, July/August 2007 | Go to article overview
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Treaty Update


Chemical Weapons Convention

After missing its original April 2004 deadline, the United States completed demilitarizing 45 percent of its chemical weapons stockpiles in June, six months ahead of the extended deadline. Since the Chemical Weapons Convention's (CWC) entry into force April 28, 1997, the United States has destroyed some 12,500 metric tons of chemical stockpiles and decommissioned all five chemical weapons production facilities, the last in December 2006. The Pentagon announced last November, however, that it would not destroy all of the remaining 15,275 metric tons before 2023 despite a final CWC deadline of 2012.

Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material

On June 15, the Indian parliament ratified a July 2005 amendment to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material (CPPNM) and revised a national extradition law. U.S. officials had insisted that the changes be made before moving forward with a civilian nuclear cooperation deal between the two countries.

The CPPNM amendment would legally obligate states-parties to protect civilian nuclear facilities and material, "mitigate radiological consequences of sabotage, and prevent and combat related offenses," as well as encourage international cooperation in recovering stolen nuclear materials. To this end, the parliament agreed to revisions of the Indian Extradition Act of 1 962 to allow offenders of related laws to be extradited. India is the first nuclear-weapon possessor to ratify the amendment. The amendment requires the approval, acceptance, or ratification of two-thirds of states-parties to the CPPNM to come into force, but only 11 (including India) out of 127 have done so.

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