Perception of Fairness in Psychological Contracts by Hispanic Business Professionals: An Empirical Study in the United States

By Blancero, Donna Maria; DelCampo, Robert G. et al. | International Journal of Management, June 2007 | Go to article overview

Perception of Fairness in Psychological Contracts by Hispanic Business Professionals: An Empirical Study in the United States


Blancero, Donna Maria, DelCampo, Robert G., Marron, George F., International Journal of Management


This paper reports on a large scale survey of Hispanic Business Professionals working in the United States. While the Hispanic population is the fastest growing group in the United States, little research has attempted to decipher the idiosyncrasies of this unique group of workers. The present study evaluates psychological contract fairness perceptions of Hispanic Business Professions (Hispanic individuals in 'white collar' jobs). The results show that almost two-thirds of the Hispanic Business Professionals surveyed find their psychological contract to be 'unfair'. Additional results are presented surrounding perceptions of discrimination and age.

The Hispanic1 population is well documented as the fastest growing minority group in the United States. As noted in the Census 2000 data, Hispanics are the largest minority group in the United States and have grown much faster than predicted in the past decade and now are equal in size to the African-American population. Currently, there are approximately 33 million Hispanics, comprising approximately 12% of the population and it is projected to be over 50 million by 2020. This group has accounted for 40% of the population growth in the United States in the past decade, growing at 60% - ten times the rate of non-Hispanics (www.hacr.org). While growing at a staggering rate, little managerial research has focused on this component of the workforce. This dearth of work is now more important than ever seeing as how the projected statistics for 2050 are even more explosive and, according to Census projections, Hispanics will then be 25% of the total United States population (Blancero & Blancero, 2001). This projected rise in the number of Hispanics poses challenges for researchers and practitioners and has important implications for organizations, especially considering the lack of scholarly work on this minority. Moreover, business researchers have almost completely ignored Hispanic Business Professionals (white-collar workers with a minimum of an undergraduate college degree) who are examined in the present study.

As with any minority group, issues of great importance surround perceptions of discrimination and fairness. While these issues are of increasing interest in relation to Hispanic professionals (Foley, Kidder & Powell, 2002), most academic research has ignored the potential differences in the workplace that this increasingly large segment of the population faces. Through this lens, the following analysis focuses on issues of the Hispanic professional's perception of psychological contract fairness, perceptions of discrimination and the changing nature of these relationships. Of particular interest are the implications for further research on Hispanics' psychological contract development and evaluation of their specific contracts with employers. While some psychological contract scholars have called for efforts into the nature of psychological contracts for different population segments (Rousseau & Schalk, 2001), there has yet to be an extensive look into the rich research potential created by the unique nature of the Hispanic professional. Thus, this research will not only further organizational research in the area of psychological contracts, but Hispanic research also, as we attempt to explain perceptual differences in Hispanic professional's interpretation of their work agreements.

This work will contribute to the literature by taking a new approach to the psychological contract in looking at new explanatory constructs of the phenomenon of violation. Numerous scholars have stated that future directions in psychological contract research should focus on addressing the major criticisms that exist in the research landscape (measurement, definition, dynamics/outcomes) but maybe more importantly the added value of the construct; this would include identification of clear relationships with other more solidly defined organizational behavior constructs (Guest 1998) as well as the testing of these alternative or "explanatory constructs" (Anderson & Schalk, 1998). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Perception of Fairness in Psychological Contracts by Hispanic Business Professionals: An Empirical Study in the United States
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.