Charting Their Departments' Courses

By Dyhouse, Tim | VFW Magazine, June/July 1997 | Go to article overview

Charting Their Departments' Courses


Dyhouse, Tim, VFW Magazine


Membership topped the agendas of incoming Department leaders during an April meeting in Kansas City. The focus: acquiring more control-and responsibility-at the state level.

Just in case Department commanders, adjutants and quartermasters felt their new jobs may be too difficult, the assistant attorney general for Utah helped put things into perspective.

"You are a formidable force," said Steve Mikita, who suffers from a muscular disorder that has confined him to a wheelchair. "If I can be successful, so can you."

Program changes headed the new procedures for incoming leaders. They were also briefed on a lower dues payout for life members and new initiatives of the Washington Office. Overall, they were urged to take on more responsibilities as national headquarters turns over more control of day-to-day activities to the Departments.

REPORTING STREAMLINED

As evidence, attendees of the Senior Vice Commanders and Adjutant/Quartermasters meeting, April 25-28 in Kansas City, learned that the program reporting process will be streamlined. Posts will no longer report their activities to national headquarters and instead will send updates to their respective Departments. Departments will then make biannual reports to national headquarters.

Other program-related items include:

Record book competition-Americanism, Loyalty Day, Youth Recognition and Community Activities-will be eliminated on the national level.

Departments will now select criteria and choose one "Outstanding Community Service Post" in its state.

The Americanism department will now be known as Citizenship Education, and Community Activities will be called Community Service.

A patriotic music CD co-sponsored by VFW and entitled Sing America will be distributed nationally to schools in either October or November 1997.

Posts that raise $500 can receive a matching donation from the federal government and participate in the National Service Scholarship Fund. It will honor a high school junior or senior who is involved in community service. …

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