Books Briefly Noted

Journal of Technology Studies, Winter 2006 | Go to article overview

Books Briefly Noted


Florida, Richard (2005). Cities and the creative class. New York: Routledge. ISBN 0-415-94887-8, pb, $19.95.

This book gathers in one place for the first time the research leading up to Richard Florida's theory on how the growth of the creative economy shapes the development of cities and regions. In a new introduction, Florida updates this theory and responds to the critics of his 2002 bestseller, The Rise of the Creative Class. The essays that make up Cities then spell out in full empirical detail and analysis the key premises on which the argument of Rise are based. He argues that people are the key economic growth asset, and that cities and regions can therefore no longer compete simply by attracting companies or by developing big-ticket venues like sports stadiums and downtown development districts. To truly prosper, they must tap and harness the full creative power of all people, basing their strategies on a comprehensive blend of the 3 T's of economic development: Technology, Talent, and Tolerance. Long-run success requires the reinvention of regions into the kind of open and diverse places that can attract and retain talent from across the social spectrum - by allowing people to validate their varied identities and to pursue the lifestyles and jobs they choose.

Frankel, Felice (2004). Envisioning science: The design and craft of the science image. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. ISBN 0-262-56205-7, pb, $35.00.

The hard cover publication of this book met with critical acclaim. Now available in a less expensive paper format, it beautifully conveys the importance of creating dynamic and compelling photographs for journal submissions and for scientific and technical presentations to funding agencies, investors, and the general public. The book is organized from the large to the small, from pictures of new material and biological structures made with a camera and lens, to images made with a stereomicroscope, compound microscope, and Scanning Electron Microscope. The text explains how to design, craft, and execute effective images, SEMs, and diagrams while maintaining scientific and technical integrity. …

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