Administering Successful Programs for Adults: Promoting Excellence in Adult, Community and Continuing Education

By Rowland, James L. | Journal of Adult Education, Spring 2005 | Go to article overview

Administering Successful Programs for Adults: Promoting Excellence in Adult, Community and Continuing Education


Rowland, James L., Journal of Adult Education


Administering Successful Programs for Adults: Promoting Excellence in Adult, Community and Continuing Education. Galbraith, M. W., Sisco, B. R., & Guglielmino, L. M. (1997). Krieger Publishing Company: Malabar, FL. 187 pages, $29.50, hardcover.

When the opportunity arises to review a book written by three acknowledged professionals in adult education instruction and research, the expectation of quality would seem foreseeable. In this case, the expectation was a reality. From the "Preface" to the final chapter, the reader is presented with a clear, concise, and literary explanation of a relevant and timely topic, the administration of programs. To often, authors of scholarly texts find it necessary to use language understandable only by experts in the discipline or subject matter. This is not the case with this publication. The text was written and published with current, or "would be," administrators in mind. The primary goal of the authors is to convey a basic understanding of the administrative process.

Galbraith, Sisco, and Guglielmino provide, in their Preface, an excellent synopsis of the book. The text has nine chapters, in which they discussed a variety of challenges administrators face. These challenges include the philosophical approaches to administration, the various environments within which administrators function, the challenges of budgeting and financing, and staff selection and development. They have included relevant information on program evaluation, legal and ethical considerations, and maintaining professional effectiveness through promoting and engaging in professional development. The book concludes with a very useful annotated list of resources for the reader. I again applaud the explicit and concise style of this text.

Administrating Successful Programs for Adults was written as an introductory text or primer, to be used and perused by "would be," new, or current administrators. It will not replace the famous analysis of statesmanship and power, Niccolo Machiavelli's, The Prince. It will, because of its condensed or abbreviated style, be a useful document. The theme of each chapter is clearly developed and the "Summary" is a definite plus. There are an adequate, not an overpowering, number of explanatory tables, models, and charts.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Administering Successful Programs for Adults: Promoting Excellence in Adult, Community and Continuing Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.