Globalization, Democracy and the State in Mexico. a Critical Analysis of Contemporary Trends of Governance Privatization and Regionalization

By Garza, Rosalba Icaza | Ibero-americana, January 1, 2007 | Go to article overview

Globalization, Democracy and the State in Mexico. a Critical Analysis of Contemporary Trends of Governance Privatization and Regionalization


Garza, Rosalba Icaza, Ibero-americana


I. INTRODUCTION

During the late 1980s, the so-called democratic transitions in Latin America were largely explained by looking into state actors and institutions' capability to accommodate democratic claims (O' Donell and Schmitter, 1986). This state-centric emphasis on top-down driven democratizations was strongly criticized from different fronts and some started to look into other factors contributing and/or hampering democratic consolidation in the continent (Kaufman and Haggard, 1995; Grugel, 1999; Grugel, 2002). As a result, globalization complex and multifaceted impacts on the state were consider a central focus of enquiry that helped to prove how the linearity and progressive spirit of previous state-centric emphases on democratization was rather limited (Held, 1995; Grugel, 1999; Schölte, 2002; Schölte, 2004). This paper's argument is located in this sort of critical enquiry as it observes that turns in the governance of global relations in Mexico have followed paradoxical directions. In particular, our main argument says that governance's decentralization, privatization and regionalization have both, reinforced and challenged some of the traditional corporatist and authoritarian practices of the Mexican state.1 So far, some spaces have emerged for citizen participation and the public scrutiny of governing authorities. However, this has taken place under a conjuncture of an ascendant material, institutional and discursive hegemony of neoliberal policy frameworks and its accompanying structural reforms according to global markets' requirements. This has had important implications for the consolidation of democracy solely through the state's institutions as the current post-electoral crisis in Mexico has displayed.2

These ideas are developed in three steps, the first of which draws on some general arguments regarding the interrelations between globalization and contemporary turns in governance. The second one concentrates on governance's decentralization and privatization trends and how these impacted on the regulatory, redistributive and political mediation activities of the Mexican PRI/Presidency/state complex. Then, it is explored the regionalization of governance and what this meant for Mexico's political economy during the 1990s and early 2000s. In particular, this section investigates some forms of engagement of private corporate and civil society actors as "region-building forces" in the macro-regionalization processes institutionally framed by the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the Economic Partnership, Political Coordination and Co-operation Agreement (EU-MEX Agreement) signed between the European Union and Mexico. The concluding section summarizes the main points developed in this paper and presents some future challenges that Mexican democracy might face.

II. GLOBALIZATION AND THE EMERGENCE OF POLYCENTRIC GLOBAL GOVERNANCE

In this paper, the concept of governance makes reference to different sets of formal and informal practices, mechanisms and arrangements that regulate social life in multifaceted ways. In contrast to government, governance denotes horizontal and multilayered forms of regulation and steering that can unfold through institutionalized and non-institutionalized mechanisms of power and authority. Amidst conditions of intensifying globalization, governance turns are deeply interrelated to transformations in "traditional" forms of state's authority and sovereignty (Camillieri and FaIk, 1992:97-100; Cerny, 1995). In what has been called a postWesphalian governance era, states are increasingly unable to exercise "supreme, comprehensive, unqualified and exclusive rule over its territorial domain" as in previous historical conjunctures (Cox, 1997; Schölte, 2004:6). In other words, as the state is territorially transcended by diverse globalizing processes, forces and actors it continues being a crucial but not an exclusive reference of collective action and identity (Lipschutz, 1992). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Globalization, Democracy and the State in Mexico. a Critical Analysis of Contemporary Trends of Governance Privatization and Regionalization
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.