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The American Conservative, October 8, 2007 | Go to article overview

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WESTERN VOLTAGE

In "The Unbound West," Fred Reed seems to have read my mind (Sept. 10). I have reflected lately on the predominance-in fact the near monopoly-of Westerners in the development of science and technology. Indeed, in my own field of electrical engineering, the first and most basic equation, E=IR, connects voltage, current, and resistance, whose values are measured in volts, amperes, and ohms, each term named for a distinguished European physicist. And similar eponyms are profuse throughout the scientific literature (as in all other fields of intellectual accomplishment).

Reed captures the idea tersely: "The modern world is almost totally a Western invention."

That was an excellent beginning, and its pleasing politically incorrect tone snagged me immediately. But then I was a little disappointed. Rather than wading into the deeper water where most fear to swim, Reed devoted his remaining space to redundant reiterations of the Western superiority theme. His writing would have been much stronger if he had explained the mortal peril that we, the inventors of today's world, are now in and told us what to do about it.

HUGH MCINNISH

Huntsville, Ala.

CHRISTENDOM REBORN

I have been a subscriber to this magazine for a few years now and have finally decided to write my praises. James P. Pinkerton's "The Once & Future Christendom" is one of the best articles I have ever read-period (Sept. 10). As a youthful believer in the resurrection of its legacy, I found hope and wisdom in Pinkerton's ideas for restoring Christendom.

In this modern age of secular warmongering and liberal pacifism, Pinkerton's "Council of the West" is a peaceful and religious remedy to the Muslim and multicultural threat and is only way to revive the great tradition of Christendom. Keep up the good work and the good fight.

ROBERT A. TAYLOR

Arroyo Grande, Calif.

FANNING FLAMES

While James P. Pinkerton's desire to unify Christendom is noble, his manifest distrust of Islam is frightening. His disdain for non-Christians and his disinterest for a united world outside of Christendom add to this concern.

His call for a Shire Strategy ("the Shire is ours, we want to keep it, and so we must defend it") is presented along with hypothetical inevitabilities of Muslim domination and glorifications of past Christian warriors who defended the West from previous "immigrant invasions." In my opinion, these arguments amount to fear-mongering and flamefanning. In reading this "call to duty," I am eerily reminded of Pope Urban II's appeal to the Franks in 1096. Once again, a misguided Christian appears to be drawing the battle lines for some inevitable clash of civilizations. …

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