The Validity and Reliability of the Teachers' Performance Evaluation Scale

By Koçak, Recep | Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri, September 2006 | Go to article overview

The Validity and Reliability of the Teachers' Performance Evaluation Scale


Koçak, Recep, Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri


Abstract

The effectiveness or productivity of organizations is positively related to the performance of the organizations' employees. The results of the studies related to the inspection and evaluation process in the Turkish educational system reveal that inspector-focused evaluation systems are not objective, reliable, or functional. Therefore, in order to raise the quality of education in Turkey, there is an urgent need for a teacher evaluation system that is multiple data-driven, participatory, transparent, functional, objective, and reliable. The purpose of the present research was to fulfill this objective. Study was conducted on 261 high school students in downtown Tokat. A teacher performance evaluation scale was developed based on the 360 degree feedback model and the new scale was investigated in terms of validity and reliability. The results show that the Teacher Performance Evaluation Scale was valid and reliable in measuring high school teachers' performances.

Key Words

Education, Performance Evaluation, Teacher, Scale Development.

Performance is defined as all the behaviors and actions that an employee performs in the process of fulfilling his/her duties (Basaran, 1985). The very first studies of employee evaluation have started in the 90's among public institutions in the US. In this context, early studies of employee effectiveness that Taylor has pioneered are considered to be the first in the field (Baransel, 19993). The effectiveness or productivity of organizations is positively related to the performance of the organizations' employees. The evaluation of an organization's employees also indicates the degree to which the organization has reached its targets. In today's world economical and social structures are being changed rapidly and these changes directly affect worker behaviors. Similar to other occupations, it is important and motivating for employees of educational institutions to receive feedback. That is, a teacher needs to know how good of a teacher s/he is or what the strong or weak sides of her/him. One of the most important issues in giving teachers feedback on their teaching performances is measuring their performances in a valid and reliable way. According to Basaran (1995), there is a great need for an encompassing evaluation model that will assess schools, teachers, and school administrators.

The evaluation of teachers' performances is different from the workers of other occupations. It is unique to teaching because there is no turning back in this profession. That is, a salesman or a physician can be evaluated by the number of costumers he or she might have; however, there is not such a criterion for teachers in most situations, especially in the public schools. Teachers face different student populations in every academic year. In addition, a more objective way of evaluating employees in any work place depends on a clear description of what is expected of the worker in that field. However, the roles and duties of teachers who are working under the ministry of national education are not clearly defined. Because of this lack of clarity, the evaluation efforts in national education system do not yield the expected results (Taymaz, 1993).

In contemporary educational systems, it is now accepted that the evaluation of teacher performances is a great necessity. Nonetheless, the specifics of this evaluation process are not known. For example, who is to conduct the evaluation, what will be the criteria against which teachers evaluated, who will evaluate the teacher, and when to conduct evaluation are some of the common questions. Tomkins (1952) studied the Turkish educational system and indicated that the system is based on superintendent-focused evaluation which does not serve well. He explains that he has asked hundreds of teacher and school administrators whether the evaluation of superintendents was useful at all for their schools or for career. He has never received a positive answer to this question. …

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