Teacher as a Researcher: Evaluation of Teachers' Perceptions on Scientific Research

By Sari, Mediha | Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri, September 2006 | Go to article overview

Teacher as a Researcher: Evaluation of Teachers' Perceptions on Scientific Research


Sari, Mediha, Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri


Abstract

Reforms in education can only be done if teachers who apply these reforms directly participate in the reform process. Moreover, this participation can only be possible if teachers are trained through pre-service and in-service to have a researcher identity inclined to change and development. The main purpose of this study is to investigate elementary school teachers' perceptions about research conducted in their schools. The sample of the study consists of 42 female and 36 male teachers who worked at different elementary schools. Fifty four of the teachers were classroom teachers and 24 of them were branch teachers. The Teachers' Perceptions about Scientific Research Questionnaire developed by the researcher was used to gather the data. This instrument was developed on the basis of questionnaire prepared by Everton, Galton and Pell (2002) and consists of 4 questions about teachers' personal characteristics, 5 close-ended and 14 openended questions about teachers' perceptions on scientific research. Percentage and frequency distributions of the data were computed for the close-ended questions and content analysis was used for the open-ended questions. Results show that 27 % of the teachers benefited from educational research. The major means of reaching the research findings were media sources such as newspapers, television, radio etc. The least used sources were in-service education courses and communication with academicians. Thirty three percent of the teachers indicated that they really benefited from educational research findings. The major problems that teachers encountered about research were: the research topics being not interesting or related to teachers' real problems; research questions being unclear and too long; a researcher with weak human relation skills; and not believing the benefits of the research topic. It is concluded that the Ministry of Education and school administrators give little importance to research findings and do not care much about practical applications of research findings. Finally, it is concluded that schools have limited opportunities for research.

Key Words

Scientific Research, Teacher as Researcher, Teachers Perceptions on Scientific Research.

For a successful reform process, teachers must renew their knowledge and skills and keep themselves open to learning and development. Educating teachers with a researcher identity is an important goal in teacher education programs. It has been pointed out in the literature that not only do teachers not conduct research, but also they are not the spectators of professional publications or the user of research results (Alber & Nelson, 2002; Babkie & Provost, 2004; Cuban, 1988; Hastie, 1992; McBee, 2004; Richardson, 1990; Shamai & Kfir, 2002; Shkedi, 1998). Basic research creates knowledge and applied studies aim to use this knowledge in resolving real-life problems. It has been suggested that the basic and applied research be integrated. No research study can single out teachers from this scientific process in the field of education and social sciences. According to Shamai and Kfir (2002), participating in a research means being in a partnership in creating the knowledge. But Shkedi (1998) indicated that there is a big gap between the researchers' and teachers' worlds and research literature is not a part of teachers' libraries. Shkedi point out two reasons why there is this big gap. The first reason is the language used in research reports. The language is usually found to be difficult to understand for teachers. The other reason is the lack of communication between researchers and teachers in practice. According to White (1992), there is another reason and that is academic research is not based on practice.

Çepni and Küçük (2002) indicated that it is difficult to find much research that was conducted by teachers in the Turkish educational literature. They considered this issue as an indicator of the teachers' lack of research culture and the lack of skills in scientific writing. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Teacher as a Researcher: Evaluation of Teachers' Perceptions on Scientific Research
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.