Nature, Nurture, and the Power of Love: The Biology of Conscious Parenting; the New Science of How Parents Shape the Character and Potential of Their Child's Life

By Findeisen, Barbara Mft | Journal of Prenatal & Perinatal Psychology & Health, Summer 2003 | Go to article overview

Nature, Nurture, and the Power of Love: The Biology of Conscious Parenting; the New Science of How Parents Shape the Character and Potential of Their Child's Life


Findeisen, Barbara Mft, Journal of Prenatal & Perinatal Psychology & Health


Nature, Nurture, and the Power of Love: The Biology of Conscious Parenting; The new science of how parents shape the character and potential of their child's life. By Bruce Lipton, Ph.D. (2002), 120 minutes, VHS or PAL. Distributed by Spirit 2000, P.O. Box 41126, Memphis, TN 38174-1126, info@spirit2000.com, 800-284-8045 (U.S. only), http://www.spirit2000.com.

Dr. Bruce Lipton's new video, "Nature, Nurture, and the Power of Love," is a must-see for anyone interested in parenting, biology, preand perinatal psychology, or the influence of genetic development. This brilliant and exciting video provides a major contribution in understanding the role environment plays in genetic selection. Contrary to the currently accepted dogma of Genetic Determinism, genes have no ability to self-start. In fact, genes are activated by signals from the environment. The old medical model, that we are merely biochemical machines controlled by our genes, can no longer be accepted in many important ways. In the old model, we are powerless and there is nothing we can do to influence heredity. This outdated belief has too often led to irresponsibility or hopelessness. The information Dr. Lipton provides in this video teaches that we are not powerless over our genetic heredity.

Speaking from his years of biological research, Dr. Lipton details the place perception plays in awakening genes. Previously, perception of the environment, particularly the mother's perception, was never considered to be a factor in genetic expression. However, as Dr. Lipton explains, it is the mother's perception of the environment during prenatal development that creates the environment in which the foetus must learn to adapt. The mother provides the information, and biology responds to it. When the environment is toxic or fearful, cells move away, there is a contraction and less growth, and the organism moves into defense and focuses on survival. But when the mother's environment is loving and joyful, the organism is engaged in growth and thrives. It is empowering for parents to know they can provide a healthful environment for their child even before birth.

Perception, as the video shows, controls biology. This radical concept motivates us to look at our own ways of interpreting personal and social environments. Our interpretations, in turn, will condition our attitudes, emotions, and behaviors, all of which will "program" the genetic coding of our children. …

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