About This Issue . .

By Conlon, Anne | The Human Life Review, Summer 2007 | Go to article overview

About This Issue . .


Conlon, Anne, The Human Life Review


. . . when National Review senior editor Ramesh Ponnuru emailed a while back asking if we'd be interested in an article from him that would answer critics of his 2006 book, The Party of Death, we couldn't say Yes! fast enough. Over the years we've reprinted much of his important work dealing with abortion and related life and death issues, but "The Afterparty of Death" (page 7) is the first essay Mr. Ponnuru has done especially for us and we are delighted to lead off with it.

We are also delighted to welcome'two other new contributors to the Review: Paul Benjamin Linton, a lawyer specializing in state and federal constitutional law ("Sacred Cows, Whole Hogs & Golden Calves," page 43), and Dr. Benjamin D. Home, the Director of Cardiovascular and Genetic Epidemiology at the LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City ("Human at Conception: The 14th Amendment and the Acquisition of Personhood," page 73).

Special thanks go to our friends at First Things for allowing us to reprint in this issue three essays which originally appeared on that magazine's excellent website (www.firstthings.com): Nicholas Frankovich's "The Seamless Garment Reconfigured" (page 99), an astute analysis of Rudy Giuliani's key moral/political flaw; Susan Yoshihara's "The False Choice Between Development and Daughters" (page 109), an eye-opening report on "sex selective abortion and infanticide," and, finally, John D. Woodbridge's moving remembrance of Harold O.J. Brown (page 103). Dr. Brown, who died on July 8th, was for many years a contributor to the Review (his last article appeared in our Spring 2006 issue) and we join legions of others who will miss his passionate voice in the abortion debate. …

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