From the Editors

Naval War College Review, Winter 2007 | Go to article overview
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From the Editors


As the Navy, the Naval War College in particular, continues to work toward the articulation of a new maritime strategy, it is well to be reminded that such a strategy will encompass more than the Navy itself. Admiral Michael Mullen, Chief of Naval Operations, has introduced the concept of the "thousand-ship navy" in order to underline the vital role of international cooperation in the maritime domain to meet the threats of today and tomorrow. But critical to this vision as well is the U.S. Coast Guard-a force larger and more capable than many of the world's navies, and one whose multiple and in some cases unique missions have only gained in relevance and importance in the current strategic environment. Vice Admiral Vivien Créa, Vice Commandant of the Coast Guard, offers an authoritative and timely account of the role that service is currently playing as a component of our National Fleet in support of homeland security, the safeguarding of order throughout the maritime domain, and international cooperation in the global war on terror.

Contributing further to the current debate on national maritime strategy is Roger W. Barnett, professor emeritus at the Naval War College, who offers a useful reminder of the importance of ensuring congruity between any new maritime strategy and the traditions or "culture" of the Navy and the sea services generally. Professor Craig Alien, current holder of the Charles H. Stockton Chair in International Law at the Naval War College, extends and deepens several recent discussions in this journal of the Proliferation security Initiative, one of the most innovative and successful recent examples of U.S. Navy-led international maritime cooperation. This is an area, it may be added, in which the Center for Naval Warfare Studies has been centrally involved over the last several years through sponsorship of an intensive wargaming program for civilian agency officials as well as naval officers from a variety of the participating countries.

The current issue of the Review also features more contributions by associates of the China Maritime Studies Institute (CMSI), a new research center within the Center for Naval Warfare Studies specializing in analysis of Chinese-language military publications. Andrew S. Erickson and Lyle J. Goldstein (CMSI's first director) provide a detailed survey of the Chinese nuclear submarine program as discussed in this literature over the last several years. Lieutenant Michael C. Grubb, USN, a submarine officer with a background in naval architecture and marine engineering, provides a unique analysis of the global merchant shipping industry and the role it might play in a hypothetical Chinese blockade of Taiwan. The Review is pleased to open its pages to Naval War College students like lieutenant Grubb, and we hope to see more such work in the future.

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