Letters


Loose language

The editorial, "Putting justice back in the Department," and the President's Report in the May-June issue, both err in describing the resignation of eight U.S. Attorneys as dismissals or firings. This is loose use of language. What happened is that the U.S. Attorneys were asked to resign and did so without knowing whether if they refused the President would remove them-the only way their four-year terms could be cut short. The question to be asked is whether or not the President had any knowledge of the effort to have them vacate their positions.

My research tells me that only four U.S. Attorneys in history have actually been removed from office by a president: President Cleveland removed the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Alabama in 1893; President Carter removed the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan in 1977; and President Reagan removed the US. Attorneys for the Northern District of Ohio and the Southern District of California during his term in office in 1982. The first two removals were occasioned by a change in administration from Republican to Democrat and the failure of the US. Attorneys to resign as was customary. The two removals by President Reagan were occasioned by what was considered by the Attorney General as misbehavior of a gross magnitude.

I suggest there is a considerable difference between a coerced resignation at the behest of underlings in the Justice Department and a removal from office by the president.

Honorable Avern Cohn

Senior Judge

U.S. District Court,

Eastern District of Michigan

A correction

The article by Sheldon Goldman et al, "Picking judges in a time of turmoil: W. Bush's judiciary during the 109th Congress" (MayJune 2007) has an error on page 270. The statement, "Three of these nominations had originally been submitted in November, 2001. while the fourth (McKeague) was made in June, 2002," was incorrect. It should read "Three of these nominations had originally been submitted in November, 2001, while the fourth (Griffin) was made in June, 2002. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Letters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.