Living into Leadership: A Journey in Ethics

By Riggs, Kenneth P., Jr. | Real Estate Issues, Fall 2007 | Go to article overview

Living into Leadership: A Journey in Ethics


Riggs, Kenneth P., Jr., Real Estate Issues


RECOMMENDED READING Living Into Leadership: A Journey in Ethics By Bowen H. "Buzz" McCoy, CRE (2007, Stanford University Press, 232 pages)

"Who are you and what do you want?"

Who hasn't sought the answer to that profound question? Real estate icon Buzz McCoy, tapping into his deep well of knowledge, teachings, writings and life experiences, lays out a valuable roadmap to seek the answer to this age-old question in his book, Living Into Leadership - A Journey in Ethics.

Living Into Leadership is not Buzz's autobiography. It is a series of stories that chronicles Buzz's guided life experiences grounded in friendship, family, religion and love - all in the pursuit of happiness and a life worth living. He taps into his vast experiences from the beginning of his distinguished career to his shift toward giving back to the world through his teachings and writings.

Living Into Leadership provides a snapshot of a man who has the tremendous amount of courage required to be honest with himself and with those around him, and explores how this honesty has paid handsomely by always allowing him to be true to himself and to build lifelong relationships with colleagues in business settings, spiritual places and intriguing physical settings.

One such snapshot has Buzz describing his first investment banking interview at Morgan Stanley. At the interviewer's request, Buzz explained his family background, and the interviewer responded with dead silence. Buzz, in turn, bluntly suggested that if the interviewer didn't have any more questions, the two should adjourn to the lounge and observe John Glenn on the initial manned space flight. Buzz was not being glib. He was simply providing a glimpse of an element to his personality that served him well during an extremely successful 27-year career at Morgan Stanley.

Living Into Leadership reveals the profound impact Buzz has already made on the business world. However, the greatest legacy of the book may very well rest in the lessons of leadership and ethics that he imparts to generations yet to come.

One can almost hear Buzz challenging each reader, in a Socratic manner, to determine his or her own legacy by making critical responses to the many opportunities life presents. To achieve quality of life,McCoy encourages his readers to conduct candid self-examination and to be willing to make hard decisions. And make no mistake about it.McCoy stresses that there are tough decisions in life, such as those described in The Parable of the Sadhu, a renowned case study that Buzz wrote to chronicle an ethical dilemma he and others faced while traversing an 18,000 foot Himalayan peak. The Parable explores the group's willingness to help a fellow man and the realization that such a decision is not as clear as it might appear.

Unlike typical professional training material on subjects such as financial and accounting issues, management challenges or administrative processes, Living Into Leadership focuses on the pursuit of happiness and the search for meaning without compromising the deepest of personal values.

With his wonderful teaching approach, Buzz challenges his reader to live a deliberate life. He talks of developing business relationships that go beyond the office and that connect at a human level. He shows his readers how to strip away the facades that are built over a lifetime to protect the inner shell and to develop personal moments with colleagues to create some of the most meaningful and humbling moments of life. The book reveals the close relationships and learning experiences Buzz has shared with business icons such as Trammel Crow. The lesson from Crow, as told through the prism of Buzz, is not a lesson about real estate investing but a lesson of love. Love, as stated by Crow, is the most important quality that a business leader needs to possess.

As a man who has enjoyed enormous success, Buzz also uses Living Into Leadership to illustrate how the most glamorous business moments can be potentially overshadowed by the unpredictable and unglamorous, such as Buzz, in a hut in the Himalaya Mountains, drinking home-made beer and eating popcorn with a family that spans three generations and recognizing at that moment that there was no other place he would want to be.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Living into Leadership: A Journey in Ethics
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.