Physiological Effects of Neonatal Management

By Garland, Kelduyn R. Msw, Lcsw | Pre- and Peri-natal Psychology Journal, Fall 1992 | Go to article overview

Physiological Effects of Neonatal Management


Garland, Kelduyn R. Msw, Lcsw, Pre- and Peri-natal Psychology Journal


ABSTRACT: The resurgence of interest in the interrelationship and interdependence between the physiological and psychological aspects of being human (i.e. in wholistic health) and concern regarding attachment issues and dynamics also questions and bespeaks both of the quality of care given to newborns and the impact this care has on their ability to develop healthy attachments and personalities. This article addresses these issues in relation to how newborns are physically handled at birth and the impact that this has on their physical and psychological well being-most specifically, how the obstetrical and postpartal procedures affect the connective tissues which have been found through research to be not only physiological in substance but also psychological in nature.

The upsurge of interest in a wholistic approach to life and health reflects an increasing concern about the interrelationship and interdependence between the physiological and psychological aspects of being human. This concern calls into question the quality of care given to the newborn. Expectant parents are demanding changes in both the labor and delivery environment and procedures, which not only take into account their needs but also the needs of the newborn.

The work of Frederick Leboyer has challenged the traditional obstetrical procedures used in delivery and immediate postnatal management of the newborn. Klaus and Kennell's research has documented the sensory capacities of the newborn and their role in the attachment process between the newborn and primary caretaker.8 The dynamics of the sensory capacities and "cognitive" structure of the newborn have been further elucidated in "Factors in Neonatal Attachment, Part I: Newborns are People, Too!!13

The findings of Harlow, Montagu, and Prescott have clarified both the relationship and significance of touch in attachment formation and later personality development. Also, the research of Caffey, Salter, and Guarneschelli has brought to light significant data in the area of child abuse which has ramifications in regards to some of the traditional modes of neonatal management.

Research into the effects of Rolfingb and the role and dynamics of connective tissue (also referred to as fascia) in the body has delineated important factors regarding the relationship between the physiological and psychological responses to experience. Hunt's recent research has given further information on the dynamics of the physiological and psychological interrelationship within a person.

In view of this information, attention needs to be given to exploring the relationship of neonatal management to the newborn's ability to attach to the primary caretaker in an effective and healthy way. How is experience registered in the newborn? What is the link that unites the physiological and psychological factors of being a person? What is connective tissue, and how does it respond to touch and other stimuli? What is the significance of touch in attachment formation and personality development? How does this data relate to neonatal management?

In exploring these issues it is important to note that newborns are totally sensory aware; they have all five sensory capacities fully developed and functioning at the time of birth.13-24 Therefore, they take in the stimuli present in the birth environment. This data is processed on an emotional-physiological level since the newborn does not possess a rational cognitive structure for processing and communicating information. The way in which a newborn is responded to and handled during this time will determine the degree to which an infant is traumatically affected by the experience.13

NEONATAL MEMORY

Memory is the ability to intellectually retain, recall, and reaccount past experiences, and to provide verbal data and description of specific past events. Because newborns do not have a developed complex vocabulary, they neither remember nor reaccount events in the way just described. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Physiological Effects of Neonatal Management
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.