Letters to the Editor

By Baker, Jeannine Parvati; Gonzalez, Carlos | Pre- and Peri-natal Psychology Journal, Fall 1989 | Go to article overview

Letters to the Editor


Baker, Jeannine Parvati, Gonzalez, Carlos, Pre- and Peri-natal Psychology Journal


Dear Dr. Verny:

Greetings this glorious holyday season. Hoping this letter finds you inspired and living fully "as usual." We send our love to you from our Alchemical Bakery. All is well.

I've been meaning to write earlier about the erratum, pg. 63 of Volume 2, Number 1 of our Journal. The arrival of the Fall '89 Journal prompted this letter. Firstly, the P.O. Box you list in the review of Prenatal Yoga & Natural Birth was incorrect. It should be PO BOX 398, Monroe, Utah 84754 for Freestone Publishing Company. Thank you in advance for rectification.

Secondly and primarily I write with a tender curiosity about readers' response to "Halley's Waterbirth." Since you hadn't singled any other author out for criticism, and then set the stage for some "heartless scientist" to deem my anecdotal research as "inappropriate" in this journal, I am excited to see how the drama unfolds. Please do forward copies of any letters received with information re: "Halley's Waterbirth." I have so much yet to learn about perinatal psychology and purebirth.

I appreciated Rima's nosology article greatly. I would suggest "Holding Therapy" be more prominent in the title. Her work with Budd Hopkins also entered my awareness quite recently.

Lastly if you are aware of Richard Grossinger's Embryogenesis, you know that I am not in favor of high tech diagnosis or experimentation on animal/humans at any stage of development. I hold any information gleaned under such circumstances suspicious as the perceptual lenses were already framed yielding limited data. Too Procrustean for my bed.

In this light I found the research for psychological impact of fetal* imaging dangerous. Of course, since it IS already happening, we may as well find a good use for sonogramic scanning. Yet it's analogous to finding some positive outcome for trepanning, since it happened-and anything that happens here by learned men must be good.

Sonogramic tests may demonstrate a relaxation into attachment but that is nothing new. There always have been multiple strategies for isolating and building up the egoic body of man. We need human families who bond naturally, spiritually and transcend the egoic primal attachments formed by medical ritual.

What IS new is egoic surrender into parenthood rather than high tech substantiation of anxiety and stress in the face of the unknown. And who suffers the most for this test? This routine prenatal ritual was originally planned to help perinatal professionals, primary health care providers, see into the mystery, prove their visions and "MANage pregnancy." A side-product, attachment/bonding between baby and parents, lately in cultural fashion, nevertheless increases the ego's illusion of controlling the separate realities.

So who suffers the most for sonogramic technology? Everyone. The baby is invaded/penetrated/scanned and the way energy works, for every action is a reaction. Like X-rays, later down the road the radiation damage was manifest. Not just the recipients of the medical procedure but the provider as well has also suffered the effects of radiation. …

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