Convergence of Conventional and Behavior-Based Measures: Towards a Multimethod Approach in the Assessment of Vocational Interests

By Proyer, René T. | Psychology Science, April 1, 2007 | Go to article overview

Convergence of Conventional and Behavior-Based Measures: Towards a Multimethod Approach in the Assessment of Vocational Interests


Proyer, René T., Psychology Science


Abstract

The main aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of different techniques for the assessment of vocational interests. In an empirical study (n = 264) a questionnaire, a nonverbal test, several objective personality tests, and a semi-projective test were applied in one single session in a computerized setting. All tests enable the assessment of vocational interests with regard to the theory of vocational interests by Holland (1997). Results showed that highest correlations to a Holland-type questionnaire were found for the questionnaire and the nonverbal test. In general, the objective personality tests were less homogenous and showed lower correlations to questionnaires. Nevertheless, all different measures showed potential for the assessment of vocational interests. Improvements in the test material and scoring methods of the newly constructed tests are discussed and a model for the combined use of different assessment methods is presented. Future research directions and a discussion on the role of a multimethod assessment strategy in practice are given.

Key words: vocational interests; RIASEC; objective personality tests; assessment of vocational interests

Information on the structure of vocational interests of a client is an important part of the career counseling process. For the assessment of vocational interests questionnaires are widely used bom in practice and in research (cf. Savickas & Spokane, 1999). Based on me interest structure, possible career choices or further directions in the counseling process can be discussed. Although a lot of different techniques are available in the field of psychological assessment in general (e. g., projective, semi-projective, nonverbal, or objective personality tests in the sense of R. B. Cattell) almost exclusively questionnaires are used in career counseling.

Despite the fact that the technique of "asking" the testee through a questionnaire is often (almost exclusively) used and that the validity of interest questionnaires is widely demonstrated (e. g., Fouad, 1999; Hansen & Dik, 2004), me technique can be criticized nevertheless. Results obtained by questionnaires might be biased because of response sets, social desirable answers, or other answer distortions (cf. Deller, Ones, Viswesvaran, & Dilchert, 2006; Kubinger, 2002; Viswesvaran & Ones, 1999). In the case of vocational interest the different prestige of occupations (Spoerrle & Rudolph, 2000) or internalized traditional career choices (cf. Turner & Lapan, 2005) might be an additional source of answer distortions. Furthermore, it can be assumed that even if the testee is willing to answer honestly in a questionnaire, it is not clear whether s/he is able to do so. The verbal ability of the testee might be too low, the questionnaire might show poor psychometric properties, or the whole test situation might be difficult for me testee (because of family or peer interactions for example). Other reasons for a biased answer might be wrong apperceptions or ideas about different vocational activities. In fact, lacking experience with a specific activity might lead to an answer in a questionnaire that might be biased by fantasies or wrong ideas about the activity. It has to be mentioned, however, that me general usefulness of questionnaires in research on vocational interests and in practice (in the career counseling process) is not doubted. Furthermore, it has to be mentioned that even if questionnaires can be faked that does not mean that subjects are faking them in all of the cases. Additionally, me consequences for the predictive validity of these faked answers are discussed controversially in the literature (cf. Kubinger, 2002; Viswesvaran & Ones, 1999).

However, information obtained by questionnaires might be biased by different factors. Therefore, the use of additional assessment techniques might be useful to facilitate the work of career counselors and meoretical studies on vocational interests. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Convergence of Conventional and Behavior-Based Measures: Towards a Multimethod Approach in the Assessment of Vocational Interests
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.