The Printing Industry

By Davis, Ronnie H. | Independent Banker, September 1997 | Go to article overview

The Printing Industry


Davis, Ronnie H., Independent Banker


Meeting change in technology with capital investment

he printing industry is America's biggest small manufacturing business. More than 52,000 printers operate throughout the 50 states, creating one of the most geographically dispersed manufacturing sectors in the country. Virtually every state, county and city has sizable printing industries.

But the average printing company is small; most employ fewer than 20 people. Because of that fact, the industry's prominence perhaps doesn't reflect its overall economic clout. Printing employed more than a million people last year and shipped goods worth more than $132 billion.

The industry is made up of large, medium and small firms ranging in annual sales from thousands to billions of dollars. Most printing companies are small businesses that generate significant jobs in their local communities. The average printing company posted $2.4 million in sales last year, a period that recorded 8 percent growth over the previous year.

Six broad sectors make up most of the printing services industry provides: commercial printing; forms, labels and tags printing; greeting cards printing; speciality printing; packaging printing; and trade services.

The printing industry is also capital intensive. It generates equipment purchases totaling more than $2 billion each year, present ing community bankers with significant lending opportunities.

Hard hit by the 1990-91 recession, the printing industry's performance has made a steady recovery since then After trending downward in the 1980s, the average printing company's profit before taxes on sales hit a low mark of less than 2 percent in 1991.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Printing Industry
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.