The Prez in the Fez

By Powell, Sara | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, November 2007 | Go to article overview

The Prez in the Fez


Powell, Sara, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


LONG-TIME POLITICAL cartoonist for the Washington Report Khalil Bendib kicked off his "presidential campaign" with a packed house at Mudraker's Cafe in Berkeley, CA on Aug. 30. Wearing his signature fez-part of his persona as cartoonist, Bendib doesn't affect the fez in his roles as painter and sculptor (see July 2001 Washington Report, p. 55)-Bendib laid out his presidential platform to an appreciative audience.

Although tongue-in-cheek (born in Algeria, Bendib is ineligible to run for president in his adopted country), his platform included points that won over listeners. Bendib promised that "as the first prez in a fez" he would act like a patriot and immediately repeal the PATRIOT Act. Since many of those detained and prosecuted under the PATRIOT Act have been either Arab or Muslim or both, this is an issue close to the heart of the first Muslim American to "run for president."

On another serious topic, education, Bendib called for "pens not guns, books not bombs, math instruction not mass destruction." Of course, being a satirist-albeit one who addresses serious issues in his political cartoons-he threw in wisecracks about Danish cartoons and the oil business as aspects of foreign trade. Bendib also cited renowned consumer advocate and former presidential candidate Ralph Nader as a role model. Nader was one of several luminaries who endorsed Bendib's new book of cartoons, Mission Accomplished: Wicked Cartoons by America's Most Wanted Political Cartoonist (2007, Interlink Publishing, available through the AET Book Club). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Prez in the Fez
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.